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Efficiency of two-phase hybrid stepping motor drive algorithms

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Abstract
Stepping motors are used in numerous applications because of their low manufacturing cost and simple open loop position control capabilities. It is well known that their energy efficiency is low but actual values are generally not available. Moreover, the bulk of the stepping motor applications are driven in open loop, with maximum current, to avoid step loss. A full step drive algorithm results in a low efficiency. In this paper the influence of the control algorithm on the efficiency of the motor is analyzed, measured and discussed. The basic open loop full-, half- and micro stepping algorithms are considered together with a more intelligent vector control algorithm. For each algorithm, torque/current optimization is discussed. As stepping motors are typically used for a broader range of torques and speeds, nominal values are not given. To present the efficiency of the motor for different control strategies, at every operating point, ISO efficiency curves are used. With these curves, the efficiencies of the different control strategies can be compared. As stepping motors are mostly used for low-power position control one can argue that stepping motor efficiency is not an issue. However the number of stepping motors installed worldwide is enormous. Moreover, a lower energy consumption can also result in less heat production and cheaper power supply electronics.

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Chicago
Derammelaere, Stijn, Hannes Grimonprez, Steve Dereyne, Bram Vervisch, Colin Debruyne, Kurt Stockman, Griet Van den Abeele, Peter Cox, and Lieven Vandevelde. 2011. “Efficiency of Two-phase Hybrid Stepping Motor Drive Algorithms.” In Energy Efficiency in Motor Driven Systems, Proceedings. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Electrical energy, systems and automation.
APA
Derammelaere, S., Grimonprez, H., Dereyne, S., Vervisch, B., Debruyne, C., Stockman, K., Van den Abeele, G., et al. (2011). Efficiency of two-phase hybrid stepping motor drive algorithms. Energy efficiency in motor driven systems, Proceedings. Presented at the Energy Efficiency in Motor Driven Systems (EEMODS - 2011), Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Electrical energy, systems and automation.
Vancouver
1.
Derammelaere S, Grimonprez H, Dereyne S, Vervisch B, Debruyne C, Stockman K, et al. Efficiency of two-phase hybrid stepping motor drive algorithms. Energy efficiency in motor driven systems, Proceedings. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Electrical energy, systems and automation; 2011.
MLA
Derammelaere, Stijn, Hannes Grimonprez, Steve Dereyne, et al. “Efficiency of Two-phase Hybrid Stepping Motor Drive Algorithms.” Energy Efficiency in Motor Driven Systems, Proceedings. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Electrical energy, systems and automation, 2011. Print.
@inproceedings{1909486,
  abstract     = {Stepping motors are used in numerous applications because of their low manufacturing cost and simple open loop position control capabilities. It is well known that their energy efficiency is low but actual values are generally not available. Moreover, the bulk of the stepping motor applications are driven in open loop, with maximum current, to avoid step loss. A full step drive algorithm results in a low efficiency. In this paper the influence of the control algorithm on the efficiency of the motor is analyzed, measured and discussed. The basic open loop full-, half- and micro stepping algorithms are considered together with a more intelligent vector control algorithm. For each algorithm, torque/current optimization is discussed. As stepping motors are typically used for a broader range of torques and speeds, nominal values are not given. To present the efficiency of the motor for different control strategies, at every operating point, ISO efficiency curves are used. With these curves, the efficiencies of the different control strategies can be compared. As stepping motors are mostly used for low-power position control one can argue that stepping motor efficiency is not an issue. However the number of stepping motors installed worldwide is enormous. Moreover, a lower energy consumption can also result in less heat production and cheaper power supply electronics.},
  author       = {Derammelaere, Stijn and Grimonprez, Hannes and Dereyne, Steve and Vervisch, Bram and Debruyne, Colin and Stockman, Kurt and Van den Abeele, Griet and Cox, Peter and Vandevelde, Lieven},
  booktitle    = {Energy efficiency in motor driven systems, Proceedings},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Alexandria VA, USA},
  pages        = {12},
  publisher    = {Ghent University, Department of Electrical energy, systems and automation},
  title        = {Efficiency of two-phase hybrid stepping motor drive algorithms},
  url          = {http://www.eemods.org/},
  year         = {2011},
}