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Robot competitions trick students into learning

Francis wyffels (UGent) , Karel Bruneel (UGent) , Pieter-Jan Kindermans (UGent) , Michiel D'Haene (UGent) , Pierre Woestyn (UGent) , Peter Bertels (UGent) and Benjamin Schrauwen (UGent)
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Abstract
It has been shown in the past that robots help to bring theoretical concepts into practice, while at the same time increasing the motivation of the students. Despite these benefits, robots are hardly ever integrated in education programs and at the same time students feel that they have the competences nor the infrastructure to build a robot on their own. Therefore the workgroup electronics (WELEK) of Ghent University gives students the opportunity to build a robot by organizing workshops and competitions. Up until now, four competitions were organized in which over 200 students voluntarily participated. This paper describes our approach in the hope that it will inspire other educators to do the same thing. We also measured the effectiveness of our competitions by sending each of the participants a questionnaire. The results confirm that students acquire relevant technical competences by building a robot, learn to work as a team and are challenged to use their creativity.
Keywords
education, robotics, competitions

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
wyffels, Francis, Karel Bruneel, Pieter-Jan Kindermans, Michiel D’Haene, Pierre Woestyn, Peter Bertels, and Benjamin Schrauwen. 2011. “Robot Competitions Trick Students into Learning.” In Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Robotics in Education, ed. Roland Stelzer and Karim Jafarmadar, 47–51.
APA
wyffels, F., Bruneel, K., Kindermans, P.-J., D’Haene, M., Woestyn, P., Bertels, P., & Schrauwen, B. (2011). Robot competitions trick students into learning. In R. Stelzer & K. Jafarmadar (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on robotics in education (pp. 47–51). Presented at the 2nd International conference on Robotics in Education (RiE 2011).
Vancouver
1.
wyffels F, Bruneel K, Kindermans P-J, D’Haene M, Woestyn P, Bertels P, et al. Robot competitions trick students into learning. In: Stelzer R, Jafarmadar K, editors. Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on robotics in education. 2011. p. 47–51.
MLA
wyffels, Francis, Karel Bruneel, Pieter-Jan Kindermans, et al. “Robot Competitions Trick Students into Learning.” Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Robotics in Education. Ed. Roland Stelzer & Karim Jafarmadar. 2011. 47–51. Print.
@inproceedings{1904120,
  abstract     = {It has been shown in the past that robots help to bring theoretical concepts into practice, while at the same time increasing the motivation of the students. Despite these benefits, robots are hardly ever integrated in education programs and at the same time students feel that they have the competences nor the infrastructure to build a robot on their own. Therefore the workgroup electronics (WELEK) of Ghent University gives students the opportunity to build a robot by organizing workshops and competitions. Up until now, four competitions were organized in which over 200 students voluntarily participated. This paper describes our approach in the hope that it will inspire other educators to do the same thing. We also measured the effectiveness of our competitions by sending each of the participants a questionnaire. The results confirm that students acquire relevant technical competences by building a robot, learn to work as a team and are challenged to use their creativity.},
  author       = {wyffels, Francis and Bruneel, Karel and Kindermans, Pieter-Jan and D'Haene, Michiel and Woestyn, Pierre and Bertels, Peter and Schrauwen, Benjamin},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on robotics in education},
  editor       = {Stelzer, Roland and Jafarmadar, Karim},
  isbn         = {9783200022737},
  keyword      = {education,robotics,competitions},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Vienna, Austria},
  pages        = {47--51},
  title        = {Robot competitions trick students into learning},
  year         = {2011},
}