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pH-sensitive textile sensors with possible use as wound dressings

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Research into new 'sensor materials': pH-sensitive dyes in textiles
Abstract
Colour changing textiles have recently gained much interest in literature. These chameleon textiles can be seen as the artificial equivalent of the colour changing species found in nature. A colour change of a textile material may provide information concerning the surrounding medium and a chameleon textile has thus possible uses as warning sensor. Within the group of colour changing textiles, halochromic textiles, which vary in colour depending on the pH, offer major potentials since a whole range of processes in nature are affected by this parameter. For example, during the healing process of a wound, the pH-value of the skin varies. The progress of the healing process could thus be indicated by a pH-sensitive wound dressing which may avoid unnecessary removal of the dressing. The aim of the current research is to develop pH-sensitive textile sensors through the application of pH-sensitive dyes on various textile materials. pH-indicators, normally used to indicate the pH of aqueous solutions, will be used as pH-sensitive dyes since they are easy available and possibly show high affinity for textiles as their molecular structures are similar to the one of standard dyes. Conventional textile fabrics such as cotton and polyamide will be investigated as substrate material for the pH-indicator dyes. Besides these traditional textile materials, also nanofibrous nonwovens will be incorporated with the dyes as the typical characteristics of nanofibres (such as high surface area, small pore size) may provide benefits in various medical applications. The results of our study showed that conventional textile materials can be dyed with pH-indicator dyes using standard dyeing processes. Nanofibrous nonwovens could, as expected, not be dyed with these standard processes but can be coloured by a direct incorporation of the dyes in the polymer solution before the electrospinning process. The halochromic study after the application of the dyes showed that a clearly visible colour change with pH was still present on the textile materials for most of the dye-textile systems. With this it should be noted that the halochromic behaviour of the dyes on the different textile materials was dependent on the surrounding medium due to the different dye-fibre interactions.

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Citation

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Chicago
Van der Schueren, Lien, and Karen De Clerck. 2011. “pH-sensitive Textile Sensors with Possible Use as Wound Dressings.” In EUROMAT 2011, Abstracts. Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux ; Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia.
APA
Van der Schueren, L., & De Clerck, K. (2011). pH-sensitive textile sensors with possible use as wound dressings. EUROMAT 2011, Abstracts. Presented at the EUROMAT 2011, Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux ; Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia.
Vancouver
1.
Van der Schueren L, De Clerck K. pH-sensitive textile sensors with possible use as wound dressings. EUROMAT 2011, Abstracts. Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux ; Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia; 2011.
MLA
Van der Schueren, Lien, and Karen De Clerck. “pH-sensitive Textile Sensors with Possible Use as Wound Dressings.” EUROMAT 2011, Abstracts. Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux ; Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia, 2011. Print.
@inproceedings{1903396,
  abstract     = {Colour changing textiles have recently gained much interest in literature. These chameleon textiles can be seen as the artificial equivalent of the colour changing species found in nature. A colour change of a textile material may provide information concerning the surrounding medium and a chameleon textile has thus possible uses as warning sensor. Within the group of colour changing textiles, halochromic textiles, which vary in colour depending on the pH, offer major potentials since a whole range of processes in nature are affected by this parameter. For example, during the healing process of a wound, the pH-value of the skin varies. The progress of the healing process could thus be indicated by a pH-sensitive wound dressing which may avoid unnecessary removal of the dressing. The aim of the current research is to develop pH-sensitive textile sensors through the application of pH-sensitive dyes on various textile materials. pH-indicators, normally used to indicate the pH of aqueous solutions, will be used as pH-sensitive dyes since they are easy available and possibly show high affinity for textiles as their molecular structures are similar to the one of standard dyes. Conventional textile fabrics such as cotton and polyamide will be investigated as substrate material for the pH-indicator dyes. Besides these traditional textile materials, also nanofibrous nonwovens will be incorporated with the dyes as the typical characteristics of nanofibres (such as high surface area, small pore size) may provide benefits in various medical applications. The results of our study showed that conventional textile materials can be dyed with pH-indicator dyes using standard dyeing processes. Nanofibrous nonwovens could, as expected, not be dyed with these standard processes but can be coloured by a direct incorporation of the dyes in the polymer solution before the electrospinning process. The halochromic study after the application of the dyes showed that a clearly visible colour change with pH was still present on the textile materials for most of the dye-textile systems. With this it should be noted that the halochromic behaviour of the dyes on the different textile materials was dependent on the surrounding medium due to the different dye-fibre interactions.},
  articleno    = {abstract F12-O-2-6},
  author       = {Van der Schueren, Lien and De Clerck, Karen},
  booktitle    = {EUROMAT 2011, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Montpellier, France},
  publisher    = {Soci{\'e}t{\'e} Fran\c{c}aise de M{\'e}tallurgie et de Mat{\'e}riaux ; Associazione Italiana di Metallurgia},
  title        = {pH-sensitive textile sensors with possible use as wound dressings},
  year         = {2011},
}