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Diverging dimensions: globalization, global system role and the structure of the international system

Lindsay Jacobs (UGent) , Mathias De Roeck (UGent) and Ronan Van Rossem (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Globalization, the increasing interdependence and interpenetration of countries and regions, has sped up substantially since the 1960s. This paper examines how globalization affects the structure of the global system. The general research question is whether the global system has become more integrated or unequal due to globalization. This is further nuanced into 2 sub questions: 1) Does globalization affect all dimensions of the global system equally, or does it differ in its effect on economic, political and military integration; and 2) Does unequal integration vary by a country’s role in the global system. According to the liberal or modernization perspective globalization should decrease international inequality by providing opportunities to the least powerful countries, while according to the world system model globalization continues and even reinforces the existing inequalities between countries. The latter model also emphasizes the predominance of economic relations rather than political ones. We propose to answer this question by taking a Neo - Weberian perspective. We take all dimensions into account in looking at power in the system derived from global system role, but research the structural evolution of all dimensions separately (Mann, 1986; 1991). Results show that the global system over time remains comprised of significantly different hierarchical blocks in a core-periphery structure, but that substantial mobility takes place. All dimensions the global system are becoming more integrated, it being the most extensive in the political one. However, where the political dimension shows a trend towards equality and integration of the periphery, dependency in the economic dimension is becoming more concentrated on core countries. The military dimension is found to be evolving towards an ongoing exclusion of the second periphery. This confirms our argument that power in the global system (and thus global system role) derives from different dimensions that are undergoing differing evolutions, and thus must all be taken into account simultaneously. Doing so nuances the apparent polarization between the Neo-Marxist and Neo-Liberal schools and could be a step towards consensus.
Keywords
World Systems, Social Network Analysis, Globalization

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Jacobs, Lindsay, Mathias De Roeck, and Ronan Van Rossem. “Diverging Dimensions: Globalization, Global System Role and the Structure of the International System.” European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts. European Sociological Association (ESA), 2011. Print.
APA
Jacobs, Lindsay, De Roeck, M., & Van Rossem, R. (2011). Diverging dimensions: globalization, global system role and the structure of the international system. European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts. Presented at the 10th Conference of the European Sociological Association : Social relations in turbulent times, European Sociological Association (ESA).
Chicago author-date
Jacobs, Lindsay, Mathias De Roeck, and Ronan Van Rossem. 2011. “Diverging Dimensions: Globalization, Global System Role and the Structure of the International System.” In European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts. European Sociological Association (ESA).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Jacobs, Lindsay, Mathias De Roeck, and Ronan Van Rossem. 2011. “Diverging Dimensions: Globalization, Global System Role and the Structure of the International System.” In European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts. European Sociological Association (ESA).
Vancouver
1.
Jacobs L, De Roeck M, Van Rossem R. Diverging dimensions: globalization, global system role and the structure of the international system. European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts. European Sociological Association (ESA); 2011.
IEEE
[1]
L. Jacobs, M. De Roeck, and R. Van Rossem, “Diverging dimensions: globalization, global system role and the structure of the international system,” in European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts, Geneva, Switzerland, 2011.
@inproceedings{1900836,
  abstract     = {Globalization, the increasing interdependence and interpenetration of countries and regions, has sped up substantially since the 1960s. This paper examines how globalization affects the structure of the global system. The general research question is whether the global system has become more integrated or unequal due to globalization. This is further nuanced into 2 sub questions: 1) Does globalization affect all dimensions of the global system equally, or does it differ in its effect on economic, political and military integration; and 2) Does unequal integration vary by a country’s role in the global system. According to the liberal or modernization perspective globalization should decrease international inequality by providing opportunities to the least powerful countries, while according to the world system model globalization continues and even reinforces the existing inequalities between countries. The latter model also emphasizes the predominance of economic relations rather than political ones. We propose to answer this question by taking a Neo - Weberian perspective. We take all dimensions into account in looking at power in the system derived from global system role, but research the structural evolution of all dimensions separately (Mann, 1986; 1991). 
Results show that the global system over time remains comprised of significantly different hierarchical blocks in a core-periphery structure, but that substantial mobility takes place. All dimensions the global system are becoming more integrated, it being the most extensive in the political one. However, where the political dimension shows a trend towards equality and integration of the periphery, dependency in the economic dimension is becoming more concentrated on core countries. The military dimension is found to be evolving towards an ongoing exclusion of the second periphery. This confirms our argument that power in the global system (and thus global system role) derives from different dimensions that are undergoing differing evolutions, and thus must all be taken into account simultaneously. Doing so nuances the apparent polarization between the Neo-Marxist and Neo-Liberal schools and could be a step towards consensus.},
  author       = {Jacobs, Lindsay and De Roeck, Mathias and Van Rossem, Ronan},
  booktitle    = {European Sociological Association, 10th Conference, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {World Systems,Social Network Analysis,Globalization},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Geneva, Switzerland},
  publisher    = {European Sociological Association (ESA)},
  title        = {Diverging dimensions: globalization, global system role and the structure of the international system},
  year         = {2011},
}