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Reverse prostheses in arthropathies with cuff tear: are survivorship and function maintained over time?

Luc Favard, Christophe Levigne, Cecile Nerot, Christian Gerber, Lieven De Wilde UGent and Daniel Mole (2011) CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH. 469(9). p.2469-2475
abstract
The use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has considerably increased since first introduced in 1985. Despite demonstrating early improvement of function and pain, there is limited information regarding the durability and longer-term outcomes of this prosthesis. We determined complication rates, functional scores over time, survivorship, and whether radiographs would develop signs of loosening. We retrospectively reviewed 527 reverse shoulder arthroplasties performed in 506 patients between 1985 and 2003. Clinical and radiographic assessment was performed in 464 patients with a minimum followup of 2 years and 148 patients with a minimum followup of 5 years (mean, 7.5 years; range, 5-17 years). Cumulative survival curves were established with end points being prosthesis revision and Constant-Murley score of less than 30 points. Eighty-nine of 489 had at least one complication for a total of 107 complications. Survivorship free of revision was 89% at 10 years with a marked break occurring at 2 and 9 years. Survivorship to a Constant-Murley score of less than 30 was 72% at 10 years with a marked break observed at 8 years. We observed progressive radiographic changes after 5 years and an increasing frequency of large notches with long-term followup. Although the need for revision of reverse shoulder arthroplasty was relatively low at 10 years, Constant-Murley score and radiographic changes deteriorated with time. These findings are concerning regarding the longevity of the reverse shoulder arthroplasty, and therefore caution must be exercised when recommending reverse shoulder arthroplasty, especially in younger patients. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DEFICIENCY, FOLLOW-UP, HEMIARTHROPLASTY, REPLACEMENT, GLENOHUMERAL ARTHRITIS, ROTATOR CUFF, TOTAL SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY
journal title
CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH
Clin. Orthop. Rel. Res.
volume
469
issue
9
pages
2469 - 2475
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000293404700011
JCR category
ORTHOPEDICS
JCR impact factor
2.533 (2011)
JCR rank
13/63 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0009-921X
DOI
10.1007/s11999-011-1833-y
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1900449
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1900449
date created
2011-09-13 13:45:35
date last changed
2011-09-14 09:49:28
@article{1900449,
  abstract     = {The use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has considerably increased since first introduced in 1985. Despite demonstrating early improvement of function and pain, there is limited information regarding the durability and longer-term outcomes of this prosthesis. 
We determined complication rates, functional scores over time, survivorship, and whether radiographs would develop signs of loosening. 
We retrospectively reviewed 527 reverse shoulder arthroplasties performed in 506 patients between 1985 and 2003. Clinical and radiographic assessment was performed in 464 patients with a minimum followup of 2 years and 148 patients with a minimum followup of 5 years (mean, 7.5 years; range, 5-17 years). Cumulative survival curves were established with end points being prosthesis revision and Constant-Murley score of less than 30 points. 
Eighty-nine of 489 had at least one complication for a total of 107 complications. Survivorship free of revision was 89\% at 10 years with a marked break occurring at 2 and 9 years. Survivorship to a Constant-Murley score of less than 30 was 72\% at 10 years with a marked break observed at 8 years. We observed progressive radiographic changes after 5 years and an increasing frequency of large notches with long-term followup. 
Although the need for revision of reverse shoulder arthroplasty was relatively low at 10 years, Constant-Murley score and radiographic changes deteriorated with time. These findings are concerning regarding the longevity of the reverse shoulder arthroplasty, and therefore caution must be exercised when recommending reverse shoulder arthroplasty, especially in younger patients. 
Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.},
  author       = {Favard, Luc and Levigne, Christophe and Nerot, Cecile and Gerber, Christian and De Wilde, Lieven and Mole, Daniel},
  issn         = {0009-921X},
  journal      = {CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {DEFICIENCY,FOLLOW-UP,HEMIARTHROPLASTY,REPLACEMENT,GLENOHUMERAL ARTHRITIS,ROTATOR CUFF,TOTAL SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2469--2475},
  title        = {Reverse prostheses in arthropathies with cuff tear: are survivorship and function maintained over time?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999-011-1833-y},
  volume       = {469},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Favard, Luc, Christophe Levigne, Cecile Nerot, Christian Gerber, Lieven De Wilde, and Daniel Mole. 2011. “Reverse Prostheses in Arthropathies with Cuff Tear: Are Survivorship and Function Maintained over Time?” Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 469 (9): 2469–2475.
APA
Favard, Luc, Levigne, C., Nerot, C., Gerber, C., De Wilde, L., & Mole, D. (2011). Reverse prostheses in arthropathies with cuff tear: are survivorship and function maintained over time? CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH, 469(9), 2469–2475.
Vancouver
1.
Favard L, Levigne C, Nerot C, Gerber C, De Wilde L, Mole D. Reverse prostheses in arthropathies with cuff tear: are survivorship and function maintained over time? CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH. 2011;469(9):2469–75.
MLA
Favard, Luc, Christophe Levigne, Cecile Nerot, et al. “Reverse Prostheses in Arthropathies with Cuff Tear: Are Survivorship and Function Maintained over Time?” CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH 469.9 (2011): 2469–2475. Print.