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Application of classification trees to determine biological and chemical indicators for river assessment: case study in the Chaguana watershed (Ecuador)

L Dominguez-Granda, Koen Lock UGent and Peter Goethals UGent (2011) JOURNAL OF HYDROINFORMATICS. 13(3). p.489-499
abstract
Benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled in the Chaguana river basin in SW Ecuador in March (wet season) and September (dry season) of 2005 and 2006. Aquatic insects dominated the macrobenthos, with Trichoptera, Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Hemiptera and Odonata being the orders with the highest diversity and Ephemeroptera and Diptera being most abundant. No systematic differences in richness and abundance were observed between dry and wet seasons, which is in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that, in the neotropics, macroinvertebrates can probably be sampled for water quality assessments during the whole year: however, sampling soon after spates should be avoided. Using multivariate analysis, stations could be clustered into three groups based on their macroinvertebrate community composition: sites with low, intermediate and high human impact. Classification trees indicated that stations with low human impact had low conductivities, while stations with high conductivities were characterised as highly impacted if the dissolved oxygen concentration was low and intermediately impacted if the dissolved oxygen concentration was high. Classification trees also indicated that Leptophlebiidae (Ephemeroptera) were characteristic for sites with low impact; in sites with intermediate impact, this family was absent but Hydropsychidae (Trichoptera) were present; when both families were absent, impact was high.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Temporal variability, Assemblages, Neotropical streams, Highland streams, water quality assessment, river basin, Macroinvertebrate fauna, aquatic insects, community analysis, Andean stream, Models, Prediction, Management, Quality
journal title
JOURNAL OF HYDROINFORMATICS
J. Hydroinform.
volume
13
issue
3
pages
489 - 499
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000292538300015
JCR category
ENGINEERING, CIVIL
JCR impact factor
1.048 (2011)
JCR rank
34/118 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
1464-7141
DOI
10.2166/hydro.2010.082
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1898001
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1898001
date created
2011-09-06 16:09:22
date last changed
2012-09-28 10:14:19
@article{1898001,
  abstract     = {Benthic macroinvertebrates were sampled in the Chaguana river basin in SW Ecuador in March (wet season) and September (dry season) of 2005 and 2006. Aquatic insects dominated the macrobenthos, with Trichoptera, Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Hemiptera and Odonata being the orders with the highest diversity and Ephemeroptera and Diptera being most abundant. No systematic differences in richness and abundance were observed between dry and wet seasons, which is in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that, in the neotropics, macroinvertebrates can probably be sampled for water quality assessments during the whole year: however, sampling soon after spates should be avoided. Using multivariate analysis, stations could be clustered into three groups based on their macroinvertebrate community composition: sites with low, intermediate and high human impact. Classification trees indicated that stations with low human impact had low conductivities, while stations with high conductivities were characterised as highly impacted if the dissolved oxygen concentration was low and intermediately impacted if the dissolved oxygen concentration was high. Classification trees also indicated that Leptophlebiidae (Ephemeroptera) were characteristic for sites with low impact; in sites with intermediate impact, this family was absent but Hydropsychidae (Trichoptera) were present; when both families were absent, impact was high.},
  author       = {Dominguez-Granda, L and Lock, Koen and Goethals, Peter},
  issn         = {1464-7141},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF HYDROINFORMATICS},
  keyword      = {Temporal variability,Assemblages,Neotropical streams,Highland streams,water quality assessment,river basin,Macroinvertebrate fauna,aquatic insects,community analysis,Andean stream,Models,Prediction,Management,Quality},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {489--499},
  title        = {Application of classification trees to determine biological and chemical indicators for river assessment: case study in the Chaguana watershed (Ecuador)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/hydro.2010.082},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Dominguez-Granda, L, Koen Lock, and Peter Goethals. 2011. “Application of Classification Trees to Determine Biological and Chemical Indicators for River Assessment: Case Study in the Chaguana Watershed (Ecuador).” Journal of Hydroinformatics 13 (3): 489–499.
APA
Dominguez-Granda, L, Lock, K., & Goethals, P. (2011). Application of classification trees to determine biological and chemical indicators for river assessment: case study in the Chaguana watershed (Ecuador). JOURNAL OF HYDROINFORMATICS, 13(3), 489–499.
Vancouver
1.
Dominguez-Granda L, Lock K, Goethals P. Application of classification trees to determine biological and chemical indicators for river assessment: case study in the Chaguana watershed (Ecuador). JOURNAL OF HYDROINFORMATICS. 2011;13(3):489–99.
MLA
Dominguez-Granda, L, Koen Lock, and Peter Goethals. “Application of Classification Trees to Determine Biological and Chemical Indicators for River Assessment: Case Study in the Chaguana Watershed (Ecuador).” JOURNAL OF HYDROINFORMATICS 13.3 (2011): 489–499. Print.