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Surgical treatment of disk associated wobbler syndrome by a distractable, vertebral titanium cage in seven dogs

Steven De Decker UGent, Jacques Caemaert UGent, Mulenda Tshamala UGent, Ingrid Gielen UGent, Henri van Bree UGent, Beatrice Wegge UGent, Tim Bosmans UGent and Luc Van Ham UGent (2011) VETERINARY SURGERY. 40(5). p.544-554
abstract
Objective: To evaluate a distractable titanium cage for the treatment of disk-associated wobbler syndrome (DAWS). Study Design: Prospective study. Animals: Dogs (n = 7) with DAWS. Methods: After total discectomy of C5-C6 and C6-C7, the median part of the vertebral body of C6 was removed with preservation of the lateral walls and dorsal cortex. The removed cancellous bone was collected. The implant was placed in the bony defect of C6. After placement, the titanium cage was distracted and affixed by 4 screws. Finally, the implant was filled and covered with cancellous bone. Dogs had follow-up examinations at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Six months after surgery, cervical radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were performed. Results: Although no intraoperative complications occurred, correct placement of the cage was technically challenging. Revision surgery was necessary in 2 dogs because of implant loosening and aggravation of vertebral tilting. All dogs improved after discharge from the hospital. In 1 dog, recurrence of clinical signs caused by articular facet proliferation at an adjacent intervertebral disk space occurred. Radiographs at 6 months demonstrated cage subsidence in 4 dogs. In all dogs, CT was suggestive for fusion of the bone graft with the vertebral body. Conclusions: Although results are promising, technical adaptations will be necessary to make this specific surgical technique, designed for humans, suitable for routine use in dogs.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
FOLLOW-UP, LARGE-BREED, VENTRAL SLOT, LOCKING PLATE, NECK MOVEMENTS, DOBERMAN-PINSCHER, SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY, CAUDAL CERVICAL SPONDYLOMYELOPATHY, INTERBODY FUSION, IN-VITRO
journal title
VETERINARY SURGERY
Vet. Surg.
volume
40
issue
5
pages
544 - 554
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000292513900005
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.265 (2011)
JCR rank
40/141 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0161-3499
DOI
10.1111/j.1532-950X.2011.00839.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1897066
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1897066
date created
2011-09-02 14:58:47
date last changed
2011-09-02 15:48:45
@article{1897066,
  abstract     = {Objective: To evaluate a distractable titanium cage for the treatment of disk-associated wobbler syndrome (DAWS). Study Design: Prospective study. Animals: Dogs (n = 7) with DAWS. Methods: After total discectomy of C5-C6 and C6-C7, the median part of the vertebral body of C6 was removed with preservation of the lateral walls and dorsal cortex. The removed cancellous bone was collected. The implant was placed in the bony defect of C6. After placement, the titanium cage was distracted and affixed by 4 screws. Finally, the implant was filled and covered with cancellous bone. Dogs had follow-up examinations at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Six months after surgery, cervical radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were performed. Results: Although no intraoperative complications occurred, correct placement of the cage was technically challenging. Revision surgery was necessary in 2 dogs because of implant loosening and aggravation of vertebral tilting. All dogs improved after discharge from the hospital. In 1 dog, recurrence of clinical signs caused by articular facet proliferation at an adjacent intervertebral disk space occurred. Radiographs at 6 months demonstrated cage subsidence in 4 dogs. In all dogs, CT was suggestive for fusion of the bone graft with the vertebral body. Conclusions: Although results are promising, technical adaptations will be necessary to make this specific surgical technique, designed for humans, suitable for routine use in dogs.},
  author       = {De Decker, Steven and Caemaert, Jacques and Tshamala, Mulenda and Gielen, Ingrid and van Bree, Henri and Wegge, Beatrice and Bosmans, Tim and Van Ham, Luc},
  issn         = {0161-3499},
  journal      = {VETERINARY SURGERY},
  keyword      = {FOLLOW-UP,LARGE-BREED,VENTRAL SLOT,LOCKING PLATE,NECK MOVEMENTS,DOBERMAN-PINSCHER,SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY,CAUDAL CERVICAL SPONDYLOMYELOPATHY,INTERBODY FUSION,IN-VITRO},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {544--554},
  title        = {Surgical treatment of disk associated wobbler syndrome by a distractable, vertebral titanium cage in seven dogs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2011.00839.x},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
De Decker, Steven, Jacques Caemaert, Mulenda Tshamala, Ingrid Gielen, Henri van Bree, Beatrice Wegge, Tim Bosmans, and Luc Van Ham. 2011. “Surgical Treatment of Disk Associated Wobbler Syndrome by a Distractable, Vertebral Titanium Cage in Seven Dogs.” Veterinary Surgery 40 (5): 544–554.
APA
De Decker, S., Caemaert, J., Tshamala, M., Gielen, I., van Bree, H., Wegge, B., Bosmans, T., et al. (2011). Surgical treatment of disk associated wobbler syndrome by a distractable, vertebral titanium cage in seven dogs. VETERINARY SURGERY, 40(5), 544–554.
Vancouver
1.
De Decker S, Caemaert J, Tshamala M, Gielen I, van Bree H, Wegge B, et al. Surgical treatment of disk associated wobbler syndrome by a distractable, vertebral titanium cage in seven dogs. VETERINARY SURGERY. 2011;40(5):544–54.
MLA
De Decker, Steven, Jacques Caemaert, Mulenda Tshamala, et al. “Surgical Treatment of Disk Associated Wobbler Syndrome by a Distractable, Vertebral Titanium Cage in Seven Dogs.” VETERINARY SURGERY 40.5 (2011): 544–554. Print.