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Rapid modulation of sensory processing induced by stimulus conflict

Lawrence G Appelbaum, David V Smith, Nico Böhler UGent, Woldorff Chen and Marty G Woldorff (2011) JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 23(9). p.2620-2628
abstract
Humans are constantly confronted with environmental stimuli that conflict with task goals and can interfere with successful behavior. Prevailing theories propose the existence of cognitive control mechanisms that can suppress the processing of conflicting input and enhance that of the relevant input. However, the temporal cascade of brain processes invoked in response to conflicting stimuli remains poorly understood. By examining evoked electrical brain responses in a novel, hemifield-specific, visual-flanker task, we demonstrate that task-irrelevant conflicting stimulus input is quickly detected in higher level executive regions while simultaneously inducing rapid, recurrent modulation of sensory processing in the visual cortex. Importantly, however, both of these effects are larger for individuals with greater incongruency-related RT slowing. The combination of neural activation patterns and behavioral interference effects suggest that this initial sensory modulation induced by conflicting stimulus inputs reflects performance-degrading attentional distraction because of their incompatibility rather than any rapid task-enhancing cognitive control mechanisms. The present findings thus provide neural evidence for a model in which attentional distraction is the key initial trigger for the temporal cascade of processes by which the human brain responds to conflicting stimulus input in the environment.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HUMAN BRAIN, INTERFERENCE, VISUAL-SEARCH, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, RESPONSE CONFLICT, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, STROOP TASK, MEDIAL FRONTAL-CORTEX, COGNITIVE CONTROL MECHANISMS, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX
journal title
JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
J. Cogn. Neurosci.
volume
23
issue
9
pages
2620 - 2628
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000292508900041
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
5.175 (2011)
JCR rank
3/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0898-929X
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1896020
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1896020
date created
2011-08-31 16:43:39
date last changed
2013-02-27 09:07:01
@article{1896020,
  abstract     = {Humans are constantly confronted with environmental stimuli that conflict with task goals and can interfere with successful behavior. Prevailing theories propose the existence of cognitive control mechanisms that can suppress the processing of conflicting input and enhance that of the relevant input. However, the temporal cascade of brain processes invoked in response to conflicting stimuli remains poorly understood. By examining evoked electrical brain responses in a novel, hemifield-specific, visual-flanker task, we demonstrate that task-irrelevant conflicting stimulus input is quickly detected in higher level executive regions while simultaneously inducing rapid, recurrent modulation of sensory processing in the visual cortex. Importantly, however, both of these effects are larger for individuals with greater incongruency-related RT slowing. The combination of neural activation patterns and behavioral interference effects suggest that this initial sensory modulation induced by conflicting stimulus inputs reflects performance-degrading attentional distraction because of their incompatibility rather than any rapid task-enhancing cognitive control mechanisms. The present findings thus provide neural evidence for a model in which attentional distraction is the key initial trigger for the temporal cascade of processes by which the human brain responds to conflicting stimulus input in the environment.},
  author       = {Appelbaum, Lawrence G and Smith, David V and B{\"o}hler, Nico and Chen, Woldorff  and Woldorff, Marty G},
  issn         = {0898-929X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {HUMAN BRAIN,INTERFERENCE,VISUAL-SEARCH,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,RESPONSE CONFLICT,SELECTIVE ATTENTION,STROOP TASK,MEDIAL FRONTAL-CORTEX,COGNITIVE CONTROL MECHANISMS,ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2620--2628},
  title        = {Rapid modulation of sensory processing induced by stimulus conflict},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Appelbaum, Lawrence G, David V Smith, Nico Böhler, Woldorff Chen, and Marty G Woldorff. 2011. “Rapid Modulation of Sensory Processing Induced by Stimulus Conflict.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 23 (9): 2620–2628.
APA
Appelbaum, L. G., Smith, D. V., Böhler, N., Chen, W., & Woldorff, M. G. (2011). Rapid modulation of sensory processing induced by stimulus conflict. JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE, 23(9), 2620–2628.
Vancouver
1.
Appelbaum LG, Smith DV, Böhler N, Chen W, Woldorff MG. Rapid modulation of sensory processing induced by stimulus conflict. JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 2011;23(9):2620–8.
MLA
Appelbaum, Lawrence G, David V Smith, Nico Böhler, et al. “Rapid Modulation of Sensory Processing Induced by Stimulus Conflict.” JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE 23.9 (2011): 2620–2628. Print.