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Substantia nigra activity level predicts trial-to-trial adjustments in cognitive control

Nico Böhler UGent, Nico Bunzeck, Ruth Krebs UGent, Toemme Noesselt, Mircea A Schoenfeld, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Thomas F Münte, Marty G Woldorff and Jean-Yves Hopf (2011) JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 23(2). p.362-373
abstract
Effective adaptation to the demands of a changing environment requires flexible cognitive control. The medial and the lateral frontal cortices are involved in such control processes, putatively in close interplay with the BG. In particular, dopaminergic projections from the midbrain (i.e., from the substantia nigra [SN] and the ventral tegmental area) have been proposed to play a pivotal role in modulating the activity in these areas for cognitive control purposes. In that dopaminergic involvement has been strongly implicated in reinforcement learning, these ideas suggest functional links between reinforcement learning, where the outcome of actions shapes behavior over time, and cognitive control in a more general context, where no direct reward is involved. Here, we provide evidence from functional MRI in humans that activity in the SN predicts systematic subsequent trial-to-trial RT prolongations that are thought to reflect cognitive control in a stop-signal paradigm. In particular, variations in the activity level of the SN in one trial predicted the degree of RT prolongation on the subsequent trial, consistent with a modulating output signal from the SN being involved in enhancing cognitive control. This link between SN activity and subsequent behavioral adjustments lends support to theoretical accounts that propose dopaminergic control signals that shape behavior both in the presence and in the absence of direct reward. This SN-based modulatory mechanism is presumably mediated via a wider network that determines response speed in this task, including frontal and parietal control regions, along with the BG and the associated subthalamic nucleus.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PARKINSONS-DISEASE, SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS, DOPAMINERGIC MIDBRAIN, RESPONSE-INHIBITION, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, STOP-SIGNAL TASK, EVENT-RELATED FMRI, VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA, ERROR-RELATED NEGATIVITY, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX
journal title
JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
J. Cogn. Neurosci.
volume
23
issue
2
pages
362 - 373
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000283356500008
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
5.175 (2011)
JCR rank
3/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0898-929X
DOI
10.1162/jocn.2010.21473
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1895904
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1895904
date created
2011-08-31 16:18:47
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:17
@article{1895904,
  abstract     = {Effective adaptation to the demands of a changing environment requires flexible cognitive control. The medial and the lateral frontal cortices are involved in such control processes, putatively in close interplay with the BG. In particular, dopaminergic projections from the midbrain (i.e., from the substantia nigra [SN] and the ventral tegmental area) have been proposed to play a pivotal role in modulating the activity in these areas for cognitive control purposes. In that dopaminergic involvement has been strongly implicated in reinforcement learning, these ideas suggest functional links between reinforcement learning, where the outcome of actions shapes behavior over time, and cognitive control in a more general context, where no direct reward is involved. Here, we provide evidence from functional MRI in humans that activity in the SN predicts systematic subsequent trial-to-trial RT prolongations that are thought to reflect cognitive control in a stop-signal paradigm. In particular, variations in the activity level of the SN in one trial predicted the degree of RT prolongation on the subsequent trial, consistent with a modulating output signal from the SN being involved in enhancing cognitive control. This link between SN activity and subsequent behavioral adjustments lends support to theoretical accounts that propose dopaminergic control signals that shape behavior both in the presence and in the absence of direct reward. This SN-based modulatory mechanism is presumably mediated via a wider network that determines response speed in this task, including frontal and parietal control regions, along with the BG and the associated subthalamic nucleus.},
  author       = {B{\"o}hler, Nico and Bunzeck, Nico and Krebs, Ruth and Noesselt, Toemme and Schoenfeld, Mircea A and Heinze, Hans-Jochen and M{\"u}nte, Thomas F and Woldorff, Marty G and Hopf, Jean-Yves},
  issn         = {0898-929X},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {PARKINSONS-DISEASE,SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS,DOPAMINERGIC MIDBRAIN,RESPONSE-INHIBITION,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,STOP-SIGNAL TASK,EVENT-RELATED FMRI,VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA,ERROR-RELATED NEGATIVITY,ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {362--373},
  title        = {Substantia nigra activity level predicts trial-to-trial adjustments in cognitive control},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/jocn.2010.21473},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Böhler, Nico, Nico Bunzeck, Ruth Krebs, Toemme Noesselt, Mircea A Schoenfeld, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Thomas F Münte, Marty G Woldorff, and Jean-Yves Hopf. 2011. “Substantia Nigra Activity Level Predicts Trial-to-trial Adjustments in Cognitive Control.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 23 (2): 362–373.
APA
Böhler, N., Bunzeck, N., Krebs, R., Noesselt, T., Schoenfeld, M. A., Heinze, H.-J., Münte, T. F., et al. (2011). Substantia nigra activity level predicts trial-to-trial adjustments in cognitive control. JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE, 23(2), 362–373.
Vancouver
1.
Böhler N, Bunzeck N, Krebs R, Noesselt T, Schoenfeld MA, Heinze H-J, et al. Substantia nigra activity level predicts trial-to-trial adjustments in cognitive control. JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 2011;23(2):362–73.
MLA
Böhler, Nico, Nico Bunzeck, Ruth Krebs, et al. “Substantia Nigra Activity Level Predicts Trial-to-trial Adjustments in Cognitive Control.” JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE 23.2 (2011): 362–373. Print.