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High-field FMRI reveals brain activation patterns underlying saccade execution in the human superior colliculus

Ruth Krebs UGent, Marty G Woldorff, Claus Tempelmann, Nils Bodammer, Toemme Noesselt, Nico Böhler UGent, Henning Scheich, Jens-Max Hopf, Emrah Duezel and Hans-Jochen Heinze, et al. (2010) PLOS ONE. 5(1).
abstract
Background: The superior colliculus (SC) has been shown to play a crucial role in the initiation and coordination of eye-and head-movements. The knowledge about the function of this structure is mainly based on single-unit recordings in animals with relatively few neuroimaging studies investigating eye-movement related brain activity in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings: The present study employed high-field (7 Tesla) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate SC responses during endogenously cued saccades in humans. In response to centrally presented instructional cues, subjects either performed saccades away from (centrifugal) or towards (centripetal) the center of straight gaze or maintained fixation at the center position. Compared to central fixation, the execution of saccades elicited hemodynamic activity within a network of cortical and subcortical areas that included the SC, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), occipital cortex, striatum, and the pulvinar. Conclusions/Significance: Activity in the SC was enhanced contralateral to the direction of the saccade (i.e., greater activity in the right as compared to left SC during leftward saccades and vice versa) during both centrifugal and centripetal saccades, thereby demonstrating that the contralateral predominance for saccade execution that has been shown to exist in animals is also present in the human SC. In addition, centrifugal saccades elicited greater activity in the SC than did centripetal saccades, while also being accompanied by an enhanced deactivation within the prefrontal default-mode network. This pattern of brain activity might reflect the reduced processing effort required to move the eyes toward as compared to away from the center of straight gaze, a position that might serve as a spatial baseline in which the retinotopic and craniotopic reference frames are aligned.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SPATIAL ATTENTION, COVERT SHIFTS, OCULOMOTOR SYSTEM, FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY, LATERAL GENICULATE, NEURONAL RESPONSES, PREPARATION SIGNALS, FRONTAL EYE FIELD, EVENT-RELATED FMRI, POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX
journal title
PLOS ONE
PLoS One
volume
5
issue
1
article_number
e8691
pages
11 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000273554600039
JCR category
BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.411 (2010)
JCR rank
12/84 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0008691
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1895785
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1895785
date created
2011-08-31 15:57:00
date last changed
2011-09-01 10:53:54
@article{1895785,
  abstract     = {Background: The superior colliculus (SC) has been shown to play a crucial role in the initiation and coordination of eye-and head-movements. The knowledge about the function of this structure is mainly based on single-unit recordings in animals with relatively few neuroimaging studies investigating eye-movement related brain activity in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings: The present study employed high-field (7 Tesla) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate SC responses during endogenously cued saccades in humans. In response to centrally presented instructional cues, subjects either performed saccades away from (centrifugal) or towards (centripetal) the center of straight gaze or maintained fixation at the center position. Compared to central fixation, the execution of saccades elicited hemodynamic activity within a network of cortical and subcortical areas that included the SC, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), occipital cortex, striatum, and the pulvinar. Conclusions/Significance: Activity in the SC was enhanced contralateral to the direction of the saccade (i.e., greater activity in the right as compared to left SC during leftward saccades and vice versa) during both centrifugal and centripetal saccades, thereby demonstrating that the contralateral predominance for saccade execution that has been shown to exist in animals is also present in the human SC. In addition, centrifugal saccades elicited greater activity in the SC than did centripetal saccades, while also being accompanied by an enhanced deactivation within the prefrontal default-mode network. This pattern of brain activity might reflect the reduced processing effort required to move the eyes toward as compared to away from the center of straight gaze, a position that might serve as a spatial baseline in which the retinotopic and craniotopic reference frames are aligned.},
  articleno    = {e8691},
  author       = {Krebs, Ruth and Woldorff, Marty G and Tempelmann, Claus and Bodammer, Nils and Noesselt, Toemme and B{\"o}hler, Nico and Scheich, Henning and Hopf, Jens-Max and Duezel, Emrah and Heinze, Hans-Jochen and Schoenfeld, Mircea A},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {SPATIAL ATTENTION,COVERT SHIFTS,OCULOMOTOR SYSTEM,FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY,LATERAL GENICULATE,NEURONAL RESPONSES,PREPARATION SIGNALS,FRONTAL EYE FIELD,EVENT-RELATED FMRI,POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {11},
  title        = {High-field FMRI reveals brain activation patterns underlying saccade execution in the human superior colliculus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0008691},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Krebs, Ruth, Marty G Woldorff, Claus Tempelmann, Nils Bodammer, Toemme Noesselt, Nico Böhler, Henning Scheich, et al. 2010. “High-field FMRI Reveals Brain Activation Patterns Underlying Saccade Execution in the Human Superior Colliculus.” Plos One 5 (1).
APA
Krebs, R., Woldorff, M. G., Tempelmann, C., Bodammer, N., Noesselt, T., Böhler, N., Scheich, H., et al. (2010). High-field FMRI reveals brain activation patterns underlying saccade execution in the human superior colliculus. PLOS ONE, 5(1).
Vancouver
1.
Krebs R, Woldorff MG, Tempelmann C, Bodammer N, Noesselt T, Böhler N, et al. High-field FMRI reveals brain activation patterns underlying saccade execution in the human superior colliculus. PLOS ONE. 2010;5(1).
MLA
Krebs, Ruth, Marty G Woldorff, Claus Tempelmann, et al. “High-field FMRI Reveals Brain Activation Patterns Underlying Saccade Execution in the Human Superior Colliculus.” PLOS ONE 5.1 (2010): n. pag. Print.