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Reconsidering the Ancient Greek periphrastic perfect: a cognitive and diachronic analysis

Klaas Bentein UGent (2011) Proceedings of the 6th Athens postgraduate conference.
abstract
This paper presents a cognitive and diachronic analysis of periphrastic eimi “I am” with perfect participle. Within the framework of Mental Spaces Theory, it is argued that the periphrastic construction started out as a resultative perfect, with FOCUS and EVENT located in the same mental space, and that, contrary to what is sometimes believed, the construction was not limited to a purely stative meaning, but in fifth-century Classical Greek underwent the cross-linguistically attested semantic shift from resultative to anterior, whereby an additional non-FOCUS EVENT-space was constructed. In fourth-century Classical Greek the construction was further extended semantically and morphologically.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
periphrasis, diachrony, perfect, Mental Spaces Theory, Ancient Greek
in
Proceedings of the 6th Athens postgraduate conference
pages
10 pages
publisher
Athens University Press
place of publication
Athens, Greece
conference name
6th Athens Postgraduate Conference of the Department of Philology : National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
conference location
Athens, Greece
conference start
2011-05-13
conference end
2011-05-15
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1892737
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1892737
date created
2011-08-26 08:44:15
date last changed
2011-08-26 10:45:01
@inproceedings{1892737,
  abstract     = {This paper presents a cognitive and diachronic analysis of periphrastic eimi {\textquotedblleft}I am{\textquotedblright} with perfect participle. Within the framework of Mental Spaces Theory, it is argued that the periphrastic construction started out as a resultative perfect, with FOCUS and EVENT located in the same mental space, and that, contrary to what is sometimes believed, the construction was not limited to a purely stative meaning, but in fifth-century Classical Greek underwent the cross-linguistically attested semantic shift from resultative to anterior, whereby an additional non-FOCUS EVENT-space was constructed. In fourth-century Classical Greek the construction was further extended semantically and morphologically.},
  author       = {Bentein, Klaas},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 6th Athens postgraduate conference},
  keyword      = {periphrasis,diachrony,perfect,Mental Spaces Theory,Ancient Greek},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Athens, Greece},
  pages        = {10},
  publisher    = {Athens University Press},
  title        = {Reconsidering the Ancient Greek periphrastic perfect: a cognitive and diachronic analysis},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Bentein, Klaas. 2011. “Reconsidering the Ancient Greek Periphrastic Perfect: a Cognitive and Diachronic Analysis.” In Proceedings of the 6th Athens Postgraduate Conference. Athens, Greece: Athens University Press.
APA
Bentein, K. (2011). Reconsidering the Ancient Greek periphrastic perfect: a cognitive and diachronic analysis. Proceedings of the 6th Athens postgraduate conference. Presented at the 6th Athens Postgraduate Conference of the Department of Philology : National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece: Athens University Press.
Vancouver
1.
Bentein K. Reconsidering the Ancient Greek periphrastic perfect: a cognitive and diachronic analysis. Proceedings of the 6th Athens postgraduate conference. Athens, Greece: Athens University Press; 2011.
MLA
Bentein, Klaas. “Reconsidering the Ancient Greek Periphrastic Perfect: a Cognitive and Diachronic Analysis.” Proceedings of the 6th Athens Postgraduate Conference. Athens, Greece: Athens University Press, 2011. Print.