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Poultry as a host for the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni

David Hermans UGent, Frank Pasmans UGent, Winy Messens, An Martel UGent, Filip Van Immerseel UGent, Geertrui Rasschaert, Marc Heyndrickx UGent, Kim Van Deun UGent and Freddy Haesebrouck UGent (2012) VECTOR-BORNE AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES. 12(2). p.89-98
abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most reported foodborne gastroenteritic disease and poses a serious health burden in industrialized countries. Disease in humans is mainly caused by the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Due to its wide-spread occurrence in the environment, the epidemiology of Campylobacter remains poorly understood. It is generally accepted, however, that chickens are a natural host for Campylobacter jejuni, and for Campylobacter spp. in general, and that colonized broiler chicks are the primary vector for transmitting this pathogen to humans. Several potential sources and vectors for transmitting C. jejuni to broiler flocks have been identified. Initially, one or a few broilers can become colonized at an age of >2 weeks until the end of rearing, after which the infection will rapidly spread throughout the entire flock. Such a flock is generally colonized until slaughter and infected birds carry a very high C. jejuni load in their gastrointestinal tract, especially the ceca. This eventually results in contaminated carcasses during processing, which can transmit this pathogen to humans. Recent genetic typing studies showed that chicken isolates can frequently be linked to human clinical cases of Campylobacter enteritis. However, despite the increasing evidence that the chicken reservoir is the number one risk factor for disease in humans, no effective strategy exists to reduce Campylobachter prevalence in poultry flocks, which can in part be explained by the incomplete understanding of the epidemiology of C. jejuni in broiler flocks. As a result, the number of human campylobacteriosis cases associated with the chicken vector remains strikingly high.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
campylobacteriosis, Campylobacter jejuni, zoonosis, chicken vector, HOUSED BROILER FLOCKS, RISK-FACTORS, MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY, GREAT-BRITAIN, DAIRY-CATTLE, FREE-RANGE, THERMOPHILIC CAMPYLOBACTERS, CARCASS CONTAMINATION, ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES, PARTIAL DEPOPULATION
journal title
VECTOR-BORNE AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES
Vector-Borne Zoonotic Dis.
volume
12
issue
2
pages
89 - 98
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000300267700001
JCR category
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
JCR impact factor
2.277 (2012)
JCR rank
46/157 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
1530-3667
DOI
10.1089/vbz.2011.0676
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1888822
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1888822
date created
2011-08-16 09:18:44
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:40
@article{1888822,
  abstract     = {Campylobacteriosis is the most reported foodborne gastroenteritic disease and poses a serious health burden in industrialized countries. Disease in humans is mainly caused by the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. Due to its wide-spread occurrence in the environment, the epidemiology of Campylobacter remains poorly understood. It is generally accepted, however, that chickens are a natural host for Campylobacter jejuni, and for Campylobacter spp. in general, and that colonized broiler chicks are the primary vector for transmitting this pathogen to humans. Several potential sources and vectors for transmitting C. jejuni to broiler flocks have been identified. Initially, one or a few broilers can become colonized at an age of {\textrangle}2 weeks until the end of rearing, after which the infection will rapidly spread throughout the entire flock. Such a flock is generally colonized until slaughter and infected birds carry a very high C. jejuni load in their gastrointestinal tract, especially the ceca. This eventually results in contaminated carcasses during processing, which can transmit this pathogen to humans. Recent genetic typing studies showed that chicken isolates can frequently be linked to human clinical cases of Campylobacter enteritis. However, despite the increasing evidence that the chicken reservoir is the number one risk factor for disease in humans, no effective strategy exists to reduce Campylobachter prevalence in poultry flocks, which can in part be explained by the incomplete understanding of the epidemiology of C. jejuni in broiler flocks. As a result, the number of human campylobacteriosis cases associated with the chicken vector remains strikingly high.},
  author       = {Hermans, David and Pasmans, Frank and Messens, Winy and Martel, An and Van Immerseel, Filip and Rasschaert, Geertrui and Heyndrickx, Marc and Van Deun, Kim and Haesebrouck, Freddy},
  issn         = {1530-3667},
  journal      = {VECTOR-BORNE AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES},
  keyword      = {campylobacteriosis,Campylobacter jejuni,zoonosis,chicken vector,HOUSED BROILER FLOCKS,RISK-FACTORS,MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY,GREAT-BRITAIN,DAIRY-CATTLE,FREE-RANGE,THERMOPHILIC CAMPYLOBACTERS,CARCASS CONTAMINATION,ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES,PARTIAL DEPOPULATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {89--98},
  title        = {Poultry as a host for the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2011.0676},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Hermans, David, Frank Pasmans, Winy Messens, An Martel, Filip Van Immerseel, Geertrui Rasschaert, Marc Heyndrickx, Kim Van Deun, and Freddy Haesebrouck. 2012. “Poultry as a Host for the Zoonotic Pathogen Campylobacter Jejuni.” Vector-borne and Zoonotic Diseases 12 (2): 89–98.
APA
Hermans, David, Pasmans, F., Messens, W., Martel, A., Van Immerseel, F., Rasschaert, G., Heyndrickx, M., et al. (2012). Poultry as a host for the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. VECTOR-BORNE AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES, 12(2), 89–98.
Vancouver
1.
Hermans D, Pasmans F, Messens W, Martel A, Van Immerseel F, Rasschaert G, et al. Poultry as a host for the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. VECTOR-BORNE AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES. 2012;12(2):89–98.
MLA
Hermans, David, Frank Pasmans, Winy Messens, et al. “Poultry as a Host for the Zoonotic Pathogen Campylobacter Jejuni.” VECTOR-BORNE AND ZOONOTIC DISEASES 12.2 (2012): 89–98. Print.