Advanced search
1 file | 755.15 KB

The exploitation of nematode-responsive plant genes in novel nematode control methods

(1996) PESTICIDE SCIENCE. 47(1). p.95-101
Author
Organization
Abstract
The molecular interactions between plants and sedentary nematodes are undergoing intense study, not only for reasons of fundamental research but also for the potential benefits to agriculture. The present technology allows the transformation of an increasing number of crop plants, providing new ways to introduce resistance against plant-parasitic nematodes. The ability of sedentary nematodes to induce specialized feeding sites in plant roots is one of the most fascinating aspects of this host-parasite interaction. Molecular approaches have been initiated to identify and characterize plant genes altered in expression after infection by sedentary nematodes. The results obtained indicate that many genes indeed become up-regulated upon nematode infection. Surprisingly, several so-called constitutive promoters that are normally used to achieve high expression in plant cells are completely 'silenced' in the feeding sites within days after nematode infection. Generally, there are two options available for the genetic engineering of nematode resistance: the synthesis of anti-nematode proteins or the localized production of a cytotoxic protein that interferes with the development of feeding cells. Nematode-induced promoters are very useful for the production by plants of sufficiently high levels of anti-nematode proteins at feeding sites. Alternatively, interfering with feeding-cell development is somewhat similar to the hypersensitive response evoked by nematodes in a naturally resistant plant. Here, destruction of specific plant cells can be achieved by the localized expression of a cytotoxin such as barnase, a potent ribonuclease. This approach, however, calls for a highly specific 'non-leaky' promoter, which is active only in the feeding cells. Another possibility is to use a two-component system, where the leakiness of the promoter in other tissues is counterbalanced by the constitutive expression of a neutralizing gene.
Keywords
beta-glucuronidase, barnase, Lea gene, promoter trapping, proteinase inhibitor, sedentary nematodes, TRANSGENIC PLANTS, BETA-GLUCURONIDASE, RESISTANCE, EXPRESSION, FUSIONS, ATTACK

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 755.15 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Gheysen, Godelieve, Walter Van der Eycken, Nathalie Barthels, Mansour Karimi, and Marc Van Montagu. 1996. “The Exploitation of Nematode-responsive Plant Genes in Novel Nematode Control Methods.” Pesticide Science 47 (1): 95–101.
APA
Gheysen, Godelieve, Van der Eycken, W., Barthels, N., Karimi, M., & Van Montagu, M. (1996). The exploitation of nematode-responsive plant genes in novel nematode control methods. PESTICIDE SCIENCE, 47(1), 95–101. Presented at the Symposium on the Management of Problems Caused by Plant Parasitic Nematodes.
Vancouver
1.
Gheysen G, Van der Eycken W, Barthels N, Karimi M, Van Montagu M. The exploitation of nematode-responsive plant genes in novel nematode control methods. PESTICIDE SCIENCE. 1996;47(1):95–101.
MLA
Gheysen, Godelieve, Walter Van der Eycken, Nathalie Barthels, et al. “The Exploitation of Nematode-responsive Plant Genes in Novel Nematode Control Methods.” PESTICIDE SCIENCE 47.1 (1996): 95–101. Print.
@article{188197,
  abstract     = {The molecular interactions between plants and sedentary nematodes are undergoing intense study, not only for reasons of fundamental research but also for the potential benefits to agriculture. The present technology allows the transformation of an increasing number of crop plants, providing new ways to introduce resistance against plant-parasitic nematodes. The ability of sedentary nematodes to induce specialized feeding sites in plant roots is one of the most fascinating aspects of this host-parasite interaction. Molecular approaches have been initiated to identify and characterize plant genes altered in expression after infection by sedentary nematodes. The results obtained indicate that many genes indeed become up-regulated upon nematode infection. Surprisingly, several so-called constitutive promoters that are normally used to achieve high expression in plant cells are completely 'silenced' in the feeding sites within days after nematode infection. Generally, there are two options available for the genetic engineering of nematode resistance: the synthesis of anti-nematode proteins or the localized production of a cytotoxic protein that interferes with the development of feeding cells. Nematode-induced promoters are very useful for the production by plants of sufficiently high levels of anti-nematode proteins at feeding sites. Alternatively, interfering with feeding-cell development is somewhat similar to the hypersensitive response evoked by nematodes in a naturally resistant plant. Here, destruction of specific plant cells can be achieved by the localized expression of a cytotoxin such as barnase, a potent ribonuclease. This approach, however, calls for a highly specific 'non-leaky' promoter, which is active only in the feeding cells. Another possibility is to use a two-component system, where the leakiness of the promoter in other tissues is counterbalanced by the constitutive expression of a neutralizing gene.},
  author       = {Gheysen, Godelieve and Van der Eycken, Walter and Barthels, Nathalie and Karimi, Mansour and Van Montagu, Marc},
  issn         = {0031-613X},
  journal      = {PESTICIDE SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {beta-glucuronidase,barnase,Lea gene,promoter trapping,proteinase inhibitor,sedentary nematodes,TRANSGENIC PLANTS,BETA-GLUCURONIDASE,RESISTANCE,EXPRESSION,FUSIONS,ATTACK},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {London, UK},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {95--101},
  title        = {The exploitation of nematode-responsive plant genes in novel nematode control methods},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1096-9063(199605)47:1{\textlangle}95::AID-PS390{\textrangle}3.0.CO;2-I},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {1996},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric