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A methodology to evaluate the reliability of the Belgian soil map for predicting the actual water table characteristics

Geert Boucneau, Marc Van Meirvenne UGent, J De Smet and Georges Hofman UGent (1996) GEODERMA. 69(3-4). p.193-207
abstract
Mast data on Belgian soils were gathered during the National Soil Survey (1947-1971), which resulted in the Belgian soil map (1:20,000). Due to the impact of man on the soil some of this information may be outdated. This study presents a methodology for evaluating soil maps with respect to actual water table characteristics. Ninety dip-wells were located on permanent grassland of two contrasting areas. The phreatic water table depth of these dip-wells was recorded fortnightly during a period of 2 to 9 years (1984-1992). A dip-well specific, regressive model was developed to describe these water table depth fluctuations and to detect changes in water management. This was found to be the case in 10 dip-wells, making them unsuitable for further analyses. Of the remaining 80 dip-wells the mean highest water table depth and mean lowest water table depth were calculated as characterising parameters of the water table depth fluctuations. In the Polder Area we found several indications of changes in the fluctuations of the water table depth due to human interventions during recent decades. Recorded depth to the gIey mottles was found to be no longer related to the actual water table depth characteristics (R(2) = 0.01 ). Accordingly, if information on the actual water table depth fluctuations is needed, these pedogenetic features are no longer workable. The Plateau of Izenberge was hardly influenced by water management practices. Therefore, the depth to the gley mottles could still be related to the mean highest water table depth (R(2) = 0.68). Accordingly, it remains possible to quantify the mean highest water table depth on the basis of traditional soil survey observations like those used during the National Soil Survey. As a consequence, the soil map data of this area can still be used to predict the actual water table characteristics.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HYDROSEQUENCE
journal title
GEODERMA
Geoderma
volume
69
issue
3-4
pages
193 - 207
Web of Science type
Article
ISSN
0016-7061
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
187378
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-187378
date created
2004-01-14 13:41:00
date last changed
2011-02-03 16:08:53
@article{187378,
  abstract     = {Mast data on Belgian soils were gathered during the National Soil Survey (1947-1971), which resulted in the Belgian soil map (1:20,000). Due to the impact of man on the soil some of this information may be outdated. This study presents a methodology for evaluating soil maps with respect to actual water table characteristics.
Ninety dip-wells were located on permanent grassland of two contrasting areas. The phreatic water table depth of these dip-wells was recorded fortnightly during a period of 2 to 9 years (1984-1992). A dip-well specific, regressive model was developed to describe these water table depth fluctuations and to detect changes in water management. This was found to be the case in 10 dip-wells, making them unsuitable for further analyses. Of the remaining 80 dip-wells the mean highest water table depth and mean lowest water table depth were calculated as characterising parameters of the water table depth fluctuations.
In the Polder Area we found several indications of changes in the fluctuations of the water table depth due to human interventions during recent decades. Recorded depth to the gIey mottles was found to be no longer related to the actual water table depth characteristics (R(2) = 0.01 ). Accordingly, if information on the actual water table depth fluctuations is needed, these pedogenetic features are no longer workable.
The Plateau of Izenberge was hardly influenced by water management practices. Therefore, the depth to the gley mottles could still be related to the mean highest water table depth (R(2) = 0.68). Accordingly, it remains possible to quantify the mean highest water table depth on the basis of traditional soil survey observations like those used during the National Soil Survey. As a consequence, the soil map data of this area can still be used to predict the actual water table characteristics.},
  author       = {Boucneau, Geert and Van Meirvenne, Marc and De Smet, J and Hofman, Georges},
  issn         = {0016-7061},
  journal      = {GEODERMA},
  keyword      = {HYDROSEQUENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {193--207},
  title        = {A methodology to evaluate the reliability of the Belgian soil map for predicting the actual water table characteristics},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {1996},
}

Chicago
Boucneau, Geert, Marc Van Meirvenne, J De Smet, and Georges Hofman. 1996. “A Methodology to Evaluate the Reliability of the Belgian Soil Map for Predicting the Actual Water Table Characteristics.” Geoderma 69 (3-4): 193–207.
APA
Boucneau, G., Van Meirvenne, M., De Smet, J., & Hofman, G. (1996). A methodology to evaluate the reliability of the Belgian soil map for predicting the actual water table characteristics. GEODERMA, 69(3-4), 193–207.
Vancouver
1.
Boucneau G, Van Meirvenne M, De Smet J, Hofman G. A methodology to evaluate the reliability of the Belgian soil map for predicting the actual water table characteristics. GEODERMA. 1996;69(3-4):193–207.
MLA
Boucneau, Geert, Marc Van Meirvenne, J De Smet, et al. “A Methodology to Evaluate the Reliability of the Belgian Soil Map for Predicting the Actual Water Table Characteristics.” GEODERMA 69.3-4 (1996): 193–207. Print.