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Globins in nonvertebrate species: dispersal by horizontal gene transfer and evolution of the structure-function relationships

Luc Moens, Jacques Vanfleteren UGent, Yves Van de Peer UGent, Kris Peeters, Oscar Kapp, John Czeluzniak, Morris Goodman, Mark Blaxter and Serge Vinogradov (1996) MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 13(2). p.324-333
abstract
Using a new template based on an alignment of 145 nonvertebrate globins we examined several recently determined sequences of putative globins and globin-like hemeproteins. We propose that all globins have evolved from a family of ancestral, approx. 17-kDa hemeproteins, which displayed the globin fold and functioned as redox proteins. Once atmospheric O-2 became available the acquisition of oxygen-binding properties was initiated, culminating in the various highly specialized functions known at present. During this evolutionary process, we suggest that (1) high oxygen affinity may have been acquired repeatedly and (2) the formation of chimeric proteins containing both a globin and a flavin binding domain was an additional and distinct evolutionary trend. Furthermore, globin-like hemeproteins encompass hemeproteins produced through convergent evolution from nonglobin ancestral proteins to carry out O-2-binding functions as well as hemeproteins whose sequences exhibit the loss of some or all of the structural determinants of the globin fold. We also propose that there occurred two cases of horizontal globin gene transfer, one from an ancestor common to the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena and the green alga Chlamydomonas to a cyanobacterium ancestor and the other, from a eukaryote ancestor of the yeasts Saccharomyces and Candida to a bacterial ancestor of the proteobacterial genera Escherichia, Alcaligenes, and Vitreoscilla.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
structure, globins, evolution, horizontal gene transfer, HEMOGLOBIN-LIKE PROTEIN, AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCES, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, LIGAND-BINDING, DICROCOELIUM-DENDRITICUM, BACTERIAL HEMOGLOBIN, MOLECULAR-PROPERTIES, PARAMECIUM-CAUDATUM, REDUCTASE, KINETICS
journal title
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
Mol. Biol. Evol.
volume
13
issue
2
pages
324 - 333
Web of Science type
Article
ISSN
0737-4038
DOI
10.1093/oxfordjournals.molbev.a025592
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
186898
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-186898
date created
2004-01-14 13:41:00
date last changed
2017-12-19 09:44:24
@article{186898,
  abstract     = {Using a new template based on an alignment of 145 nonvertebrate globins we examined several recently determined sequences of putative globins and globin-like hemeproteins. We propose that all globins have evolved from a family of ancestral, approx. 17-kDa hemeproteins, which displayed the globin fold and functioned as redox proteins. Once atmospheric O-2 became available the acquisition of oxygen-binding properties was initiated, culminating in the various highly specialized functions known at present. During this evolutionary process, we suggest that (1) high oxygen affinity may have been acquired repeatedly and (2) the formation of chimeric proteins containing both a globin and a flavin binding domain was an additional and distinct evolutionary trend. Furthermore, globin-like hemeproteins encompass hemeproteins produced through convergent evolution from nonglobin ancestral proteins to carry out O-2-binding functions as well as hemeproteins whose sequences exhibit the loss of some or all of the structural determinants of the globin fold. We also propose that there occurred two cases of horizontal globin gene transfer, one from an ancestor common to the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena and the green alga Chlamydomonas to a cyanobacterium ancestor and the other, from a eukaryote ancestor of the yeasts Saccharomyces and Candida to a bacterial ancestor of the proteobacterial genera Escherichia, Alcaligenes, and Vitreoscilla.},
  author       = {Moens, Luc and Vanfleteren, Jacques and Van de Peer, Yves and Peeters, Kris and Kapp, Oscar and Czeluzniak, John and Goodman, Morris and Blaxter, Mark and Vinogradov, Serge},
  issn         = {0737-4038},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION},
  keyword      = {structure,globins,evolution,horizontal gene transfer,HEMOGLOBIN-LIKE PROTEIN,AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCES,ESCHERICHIA-COLI,LIGAND-BINDING,DICROCOELIUM-DENDRITICUM,BACTERIAL HEMOGLOBIN,MOLECULAR-PROPERTIES,PARAMECIUM-CAUDATUM,REDUCTASE,KINETICS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {324--333},
  title        = {Globins in nonvertebrate species: dispersal by horizontal gene transfer and evolution of the structure-function relationships},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.molbev.a025592},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {1996},
}

Chicago
Moens, Luc, Jacques Vanfleteren, Yves Van de Peer, Kris Peeters, Oscar Kapp, John Czeluzniak, Morris Goodman, Mark Blaxter, and Serge Vinogradov. 1996. “Globins in Nonvertebrate Species: Dispersal by Horizontal Gene Transfer and Evolution of the Structure-function Relationships.” Molecular Biology and Evolution 13 (2): 324–333.
APA
Moens, L., Vanfleteren, J., Van de Peer, Y., Peeters, K., Kapp, O., Czeluzniak, J., Goodman, M., et al. (1996). Globins in nonvertebrate species: dispersal by horizontal gene transfer and evolution of the structure-function relationships. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, 13(2), 324–333.
Vancouver
1.
Moens L, Vanfleteren J, Van de Peer Y, Peeters K, Kapp O, Czeluzniak J, et al. Globins in nonvertebrate species: dispersal by horizontal gene transfer and evolution of the structure-function relationships. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. 1996;13(2):324–33.
MLA
Moens, Luc, Jacques Vanfleteren, Yves Van de Peer, et al. “Globins in Nonvertebrate Species: Dispersal by Horizontal Gene Transfer and Evolution of the Structure-function Relationships.” MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION 13.2 (1996): 324–333. Print.