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Prediction of the pressure distribution on buildings with CFD: reliable CFD predictions of the pressure distribution on buildings on very coarse meshes

Demir Ali Köse UGent and Erik Dick UGent (2011)
abstract
The book consists of an introduction chapter, 7 technical chapters and a conclusion chapter. In the introduction, we discuss the existing experimental and numerical studies on flow around obstacles in fully developed channel flow and in atmospheric boundary layer flow. In the first part of chapter 2, the equations governing the flow are briefly derived and described. In the second part, some spatial and temporal discretization schemes are discussed. After a description of turbulence in general and the energy cascade mechanism, in chapter 3, the different RANS, hybrid RANS/LES and LES models are discussed in some detail. Also in chapter 3, two new wall models are derived. The first one is an explicit wall model for smooth walls. The second one is a wall model for rough surfaces that allows including roughness effects in LES simulations. The need for such a model rises from the fact that in FLUENT it is not possible to include roughness in LES. In chapter 4, the flow around a cube in a fully developed channel is studied. We test RANS, hybrid RANS/LES models and LES models in combination with wall models to investigate if reasonably accurate predictions of the flow field, in particular mean velocity profiles and pressure distributions, are possible on coarse grids. A similar analysis is performed on the cubical Silsoe building in ABL flow in chapter 5. Compared to the cube in channel case, the Reynolds number is 2 orders of magnitude larger. In chapter 6, buildings with other shapes are analyzed. In particular, we simulate the air flow around the TTU–building and the glass house. The former is brick–shaped, while the latter looks like a small, single floor house. The importance of correct inflow conditions and the effect on the simulation results is analyzed and discussed in chapter 7. Different approaches, available in the literature, are described and tested. The case of absence of experimental inflow data is also considered, and an applicable approach is offered to deal with such a situation. Since one of our objectives is to obtain reliable predictions on grids that are as coarse as possible, we perform a grid coarsening study in chapter 8. Three additional coarser grids for the Silsoe building and two for the TTU–building and the glass house are generated. The impact of coarsening on the pressure predictions is investigated and guidelines for minimum grid requirements are presented. Finally, in chapter 9, the main conclusions are formulated and some guidelines for future work are given.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
book
publication status
published
subject
keyword
pressure distribution prediction, Flow over buildings, computational fluid dynamics
pages
XIV, 311 pages
publisher
Lambert Academic
place of publication
Saarbrücken, Germany
ISBN
9783844317169
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
B1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1867249
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1867249
date created
2011-08-05 07:10:17
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:55:04
@book{1867249,
  abstract     = {The book consists of an introduction chapter, 7 technical chapters and a conclusion chapter.
In the introduction, we discuss the existing experimental and numerical studies on flow around obstacles in fully developed channel flow and in atmospheric boundary layer flow. 
In the first part of chapter 2, the equations governing the flow are briefly derived and described. In the second part, some spatial and temporal discretization schemes are discussed.
After a description of turbulence in general and the energy cascade mechanism, in chapter 3, the different RANS, hybrid RANS/LES and LES models are discussed in some detail. Also in chapter 3, two new wall models are derived. The first one is an explicit wall model for smooth walls. The second one is a wall model for rough surfaces that allows including roughness effects in LES simulations. The need for such a model rises from the fact that in FLUENT it is not possible to include roughness in LES.
In chapter 4, the flow around a cube in a fully developed channel is studied. We test RANS, hybrid RANS/LES models and LES models in combination with wall models to investigate if reasonably accurate predictions of the flow field, in particular mean velocity profiles and pressure distributions, are possible on coarse grids.
A similar analysis is performed on the cubical Silsoe building in ABL flow in chapter 5. Compared to the cube in channel case, the Reynolds number is 2 orders of magnitude larger.
In chapter 6, buildings with other shapes are analyzed. In particular, we simulate the air flow around the TTU--building and the glass house. The former is brick--shaped, while the latter looks like a small, single floor house. 
The importance of correct inflow conditions and the effect on the simulation results is analyzed and discussed in chapter 7. Different approaches, available in the literature, are described and tested. The case of absence of experimental inflow data is also considered, and an applicable approach is offered to deal with such a situation.
Since one of our objectives is to obtain reliable predictions on grids that are as coarse as possible, we perform a grid coarsening study in chapter 8. Three additional coarser grids for the Silsoe building and two for the TTU--building and the glass house are generated. The impact of coarsening on the pressure predictions is investigated and guidelines for minimum grid requirements are presented.
Finally, in chapter 9, the main conclusions are formulated and some guidelines for future work are given.},
  author       = {K{\"o}se, Demir Ali and Dick, Erik},
  isbn         = {9783844317169},
  keyword      = {pressure distribution prediction,Flow over buildings,computational fluid dynamics},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {XIV, 311},
  publisher    = {Lambert Academic},
  title        = {Prediction of the pressure distribution on buildings with CFD: reliable CFD predictions of the pressure distribution on buildings on very coarse meshes},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Köse, Demir Ali, and Erik Dick. 2011. Prediction of the Pressure Distribution on Buildings with CFD: Reliable CFD Predictions of the Pressure Distribution on Buildings on Very Coarse Meshes. Saarbrücken, Germany: Lambert Academic.
APA
Köse, D. A., & Dick, E. (2011). Prediction of the pressure distribution on buildings with CFD: reliable CFD predictions of the pressure distribution on buildings on very coarse meshes. Saarbrücken, Germany: Lambert Academic.
Vancouver
1.
Köse DA, Dick E. Prediction of the pressure distribution on buildings with CFD: reliable CFD predictions of the pressure distribution on buildings on very coarse meshes. Saarbrücken, Germany: Lambert Academic; 2011.
MLA
Köse, Demir Ali, and Erik Dick. Prediction of the Pressure Distribution on Buildings with CFD: Reliable CFD Predictions of the Pressure Distribution on Buildings on Very Coarse Meshes. Saarbrücken, Germany: Lambert Academic, 2011. Print.