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Knowledge of a second language influences auditory word recognition in the native language

Evelyne Lagrou UGent, Robert Hartsuiker UGent and Wouter Duyck UGent (2011) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. 37(4). p.952-965
abstract
Many studies in bilingual visual word recognition have demonstrated that lexical access is not language selective. However, research on bilingual word recognition in the auditory modality has been scarce, and it has yielded mixed results with regard to the degree of this language nonselectivity. In the present study, we investigated whether listening to a second language (L2) is influenced by knowledge of the native language (L1) and, more important, whether listening to the L1 is also influenced by knowledge of an L2. Additionally, we investigated whether the listener's selectivity of lexical access is influenced by the speaker's L1 (and thus his or her accent). With this aim, Dutch-English bilinguals completed an English (Experiment 1) and a Dutch (Experiment 3) auditory lexical decision task. As a control, the English auditory lexical decision task was also completed by English monolinguals (Experiment 2). Targets were pronounced by a native Dutch speaker with English as the L2 (Experiments 1A, 2A, and 3A) or by a native English speaker with Dutch as the L2 (Experiments 1B, 2B, and 3B). In all experiments, Dutch-English bilinguals recognized interlingual homophones (e.g., lief [sweet]-leaf /li:f/) significantly slower than matched control words, whereas the English monolinguals showed no effect. These results indicate that (a) lexical access in bilingual auditory word recognition is not language selective in L2, nor in L1, and (b) language-specific subphonological cues do not annul cross-lingual interactions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
TRANSLATION, accented speech, PERCEPTION, COMPREHENSION, CONSTRAINTS, bilingualism, auditory word recognition, lexical access, SENTENCE CONTEXT, CONTINUOUS SPEECH, ACCESS, MODEL, INTERLINGUAL HOMOGRAPH RECOGNITION, BILINGUAL LEXICAL ACTIVATION
journal title
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION
J. Exp. Psychol.-Learn. Mem. Cogn.
volume
37
issue
4
pages
952 - 965
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000292418600012
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.854 (2011)
JCR rank
18/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0278-7393
DOI
10.1037/a0023217
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1864027
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1864027
date created
2011-08-01 11:08:22
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:49:21
@article{1864027,
  abstract     = {Many studies in bilingual visual word recognition have demonstrated that lexical access is not language selective. However, research on bilingual word recognition in the auditory modality has been scarce, and it has yielded mixed results with regard to the degree of this language nonselectivity. In the present study, we investigated whether listening to a second language (L2) is influenced by knowledge of the native language (L1) and, more important, whether listening to the L1 is also influenced by knowledge of an L2. Additionally, we investigated whether the listener's selectivity of lexical access is influenced by the speaker's L1 (and thus his or her accent). With this aim, Dutch-English bilinguals completed an English (Experiment 1) and a Dutch (Experiment 3) auditory lexical decision task. As a control, the English auditory lexical decision task was also completed by English monolinguals (Experiment 2). Targets were pronounced by a native Dutch speaker with English as the L2 (Experiments 1A, 2A, and 3A) or by a native English speaker with Dutch as the L2 (Experiments 1B, 2B, and 3B). In all experiments, Dutch-English bilinguals recognized interlingual homophones (e.g., lief [sweet]-leaf /li:f/) significantly slower than matched control words, whereas the English monolinguals showed no effect. These results indicate that (a) lexical access in bilingual auditory word recognition is not language selective in L2, nor in L1, and (b) language-specific subphonological cues do not annul cross-lingual interactions.},
  author       = {Lagrou, Evelyne and Hartsuiker, Robert and Duyck, Wouter},
  issn         = {0278-7393},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION},
  keyword      = {TRANSLATION,accented speech,PERCEPTION,COMPREHENSION,CONSTRAINTS,bilingualism,auditory word recognition,lexical access,SENTENCE CONTEXT,CONTINUOUS SPEECH,ACCESS,MODEL,INTERLINGUAL HOMOGRAPH RECOGNITION,BILINGUAL LEXICAL ACTIVATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {952--965},
  title        = {Knowledge of a second language influences auditory word recognition in the native language},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0023217},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Lagrou, Evelyne, Robert Hartsuiker, and Wouter Duyck. 2011. “Knowledge of a Second Language Influences Auditory Word Recognition in the Native Language.” Journal of Experimental Psychology-learning Memory and Cognition 37 (4): 952–965.
APA
Lagrou, E., Hartsuiker, R., & Duyck, W. (2011). Knowledge of a second language influences auditory word recognition in the native language. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 37(4), 952–965.
Vancouver
1.
Lagrou E, Hartsuiker R, Duyck W. Knowledge of a second language influences auditory word recognition in the native language. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION. 2011;37(4):952–65.
MLA
Lagrou, Evelyne, Robert Hartsuiker, and Wouter Duyck. “Knowledge of a Second Language Influences Auditory Word Recognition in the Native Language.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION 37.4 (2011): 952–965. Print.