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Applied philosophy extended to experimental philosophy: a case study in medical diagnostics

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Abstract
Physicians are often seen as experts (or authorities) in a medical diagnostic process. Medical researchers are interested in how authority works in medicine. Philosophers have argued that scientific , moral , or almost all knowledge depends for its acquisition on trust in the testimony of others. Trust enhances cooperation; because it removes the incentive to check up on other people, making cooperation with trust less complicated than cooperation without it . The argument for the need to trust what others say is that no person has the intellect, experience, and time necessary to learn, independently, every fact about the world . This and the continuing specialization of medical knowledge, calls in the need to base one’s arguments on authority. Doing this reduces the notion of trust to a weaker form, i.e. blind trust, resulting in major implications for the way we think about medical decision making. Experimental research dealing with authority arguments in clinical practice will open up physicians’ eyes on the actual role authority plays in decision-making. Thus, experimental philosophy can be a helpful tool for applied philosophy.
Keywords
authority, medical patient-physician relation, applied philosophy, experimental philosophy

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Chicago
Van Droogenbroeck, Stéphanie, and Laszlo Kosolosky. 2010. “Applied Philosophy Extended to Experimental Philosophy: a Case Study in Medical Diagnostics.” In Society for Applied Philosophy Annual Conference, Abstracts.
APA
Van Droogenbroeck, S., & Kosolosky, L. (2010). Applied philosophy extended to experimental philosophy: a case study in medical diagnostics. Society for applied philosophy annual conference, Abstracts. Presented at the Society for Applied Philosophy Annual Conference.
Vancouver
1.
Van Droogenbroeck S, Kosolosky L. Applied philosophy extended to experimental philosophy: a case study in medical diagnostics. Society for applied philosophy annual conference, Abstracts. 2010.
MLA
Van Droogenbroeck, Stéphanie, and Laszlo Kosolosky. “Applied Philosophy Extended to Experimental Philosophy: a Case Study in Medical Diagnostics.” Society for Applied Philosophy Annual Conference, Abstracts. 2010. Print.
@inproceedings{1862204,
  abstract     = {Physicians are often seen as experts (or authorities) in a medical diagnostic process. Medical researchers are interested in how authority works in medicine. Philosophers have argued that scientific , moral , or almost all knowledge  depends for its acquisition on trust in the testimony of others. Trust enhances cooperation; because it removes the incentive to check up on other people, making cooperation with trust less complicated than cooperation without it . The argument for the need to trust what others say is that no person has the intellect, experience, and time necessary to learn, independently, every fact about the world . This and the continuing specialization of medical knowledge, calls in the need to base one’s arguments on authority. Doing this reduces the notion of trust to a weaker form, i.e. blind trust, resulting in major implications for the way we think about medical decision making. Experimental research dealing with authority arguments in clinical practice will open up physicians’ eyes on the actual role authority plays in decision-making. Thus, experimental philosophy can be a helpful tool for applied philosophy.},
  author       = {Van Droogenbroeck, Stéphanie and Kosolosky, Laszlo},
  booktitle    = {Society for applied philosophy annual conference, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {authority,medical patient-physician relation,applied philosophy,experimental philosophy},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Oxford, UK},
  title        = {Applied philosophy extended to experimental philosophy: a case study in medical diagnostics},
  year         = {2010},
}