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Emotional mobility and gender in the court room: the perspective of the consistory courts of Cambrai, Brussels and Tournai

(2010) ITINERARIA (TAVARNUZZE). 8-9. p.301-326
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Abstract
Consistory court records show how the rules in canon law regarding entering into marriage were enforced. An examination of the reasons why spouses ran away from their parishes of residence would suggest two major possible fields of research: first, into informal or clandestine marriages; and, second, into marriage impediments, especially those relating to pre-contract and incest. Freedom in the choice of a marriage partner meant that the consent of a third party was not necessary. However, the physical act of fleeing the community (physical mobility) often reflected a change in the affections of one or other partner (emotional mobility) even self-divorce (leaving one spouse and taking another), while some combination of fraud, self-deception, and fear of social control often prompted a decision to undertake some kind of journey.
Keywords
Women's History, Gender, Low Countries, Middle Ages, Canon Law, Travel History, Sources

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Melkebeek, Monique. 2010. “Emotional Mobility and Gender in the Court Room: The Perspective of the Consistory Courts of Cambrai, Brussels and Tournai.” Itineraria (tavarnuzze) 8-9: 301–326.
APA
Van Melkebeek, M. (2010). Emotional mobility and gender in the court room: the perspective of the consistory courts of Cambrai, Brussels and Tournai. ITINERARIA (TAVARNUZZE), 8-9, 301–326.
Vancouver
1.
Van Melkebeek M. Emotional mobility and gender in the court room: the perspective of the consistory courts of Cambrai, Brussels and Tournai. ITINERARIA (TAVARNUZZE). 2010;8-9:301–26.
MLA
Van Melkebeek, Monique. “Emotional Mobility and Gender in the Court Room: The Perspective of the Consistory Courts of Cambrai, Brussels and Tournai.” ITINERARIA (TAVARNUZZE) 8-9 (2010): 301–326. Print.
@article{1858457,
  abstract     = {Consistory court records show how the rules in canon law regarding entering into marriage were enforced. An examination of the reasons why spouses ran away from their parishes of residence would suggest two major possible fields of research: first, into informal or clandestine marriages; and, second, into marriage impediments, especially those relating to pre-contract and incest. Freedom in the choice of a marriage partner meant that the consent of a third party was not necessary. However, the physical act of fleeing the community (physical mobility) often reflected a change in the affections of one or other partner (emotional mobility) even self-divorce (leaving one spouse and taking another), while some combination of fraud, self-deception, and fear of social control often prompted a decision to undertake some kind of journey.},
  author       = {Van Melkebeek, Monique},
  issn         = {1594-1019},
  journal      = {ITINERARIA (TAVARNUZZE)},
  keyword      = {Women's History,Gender,Low Countries,Middle Ages,Canon Law,Travel History,Sources},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {301--326},
  title        = {Emotional mobility and gender in the court room: the perspective of the consistory courts of Cambrai, Brussels and Tournai},
  volume       = {8-9},
  year         = {2010},
}