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Swimming into memory: the Los Angeles Olympics (1932) as Japanese lieu de mémoire

Andreas Niehaus UGent (2011) SPORT IN SOCIETY. 14(4). p.430-443
abstract
This paper will analyse the swimming events of the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics in the framework of collective memory. Olympic Games are memorable moments in the history of a nation. As moments they are a unit of time, but they are equally part of an Olympic as well as a national narrative sequence: Each Olympic Games continues the established rituals and symbolism of the Olympic Movement and each athletic event is firmly based in the history of prior athletic events. Performative practices are, in this sense, also commemorative practices that function as cues for collective memories. The memory of the 1932 swimming competitions thrives on the notion that Japan once has been a nation of extraordinary skilled and successful swimmers. I will show that the significance of the 1932 swimming competitions as lieu de me´moire is not based on the invention of a tradition, but rather lies in them being a frame of reference to verify the invented past as present.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
SPORT IN SOCIETY
volume
14
issue
4
pages
430 - 443
ISSN
1743-0437
DOI
10.1080/17430437.2011.565922
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:321226
VABB type
VABB-1
id
1853205
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1853205
date created
2011-07-05 16:49:06
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:50
@article{1853205,
  abstract     = {This paper will analyse the swimming events of the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics in the framework of collective memory. Olympic Games are memorable moments in the
history of a nation. As moments they are a unit of time, but they are equally part of an Olympic as well as a national narrative sequence: Each Olympic Games continues the established rituals and symbolism of the Olympic Movement and each athletic event is firmly based in the history of prior athletic events. Performative practices are, in this sense, also commemorative practices that function as cues for collective memories. The memory of the 1932 swimming competitions thrives on the notion that Japan once has been a nation of extraordinary skilled and successful swimmers. I will show that the significance of the 1932 swimming competitions as lieu de me{\textasciiacute}moire is not based on the invention of a tradition, but rather lies in them being a frame of reference to verify the invented past as present.},
  author       = {Niehaus, Andreas},
  issn         = {1743-0437},
  journal      = {SPORT IN SOCIETY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {430--443},
  title        = {Swimming into memory: the Los Angeles Olympics (1932) as Japanese lieu de m{\'e}moire},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17430437.2011.565922},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Niehaus, Andreas. 2011. “Swimming into Memory: The Los Angeles Olympics (1932) as Japanese Lieu De Mémoire.” Sport in Society 14 (4): 430–443.
APA
Niehaus, A. (2011). Swimming into memory: the Los Angeles Olympics (1932) as Japanese lieu de mémoire. SPORT IN SOCIETY, 14(4), 430–443.
Vancouver
1.
Niehaus A. Swimming into memory: the Los Angeles Olympics (1932) as Japanese lieu de mémoire. SPORT IN SOCIETY. 2011;14(4):430–43.
MLA
Niehaus, Andreas. “Swimming into Memory: The Los Angeles Olympics (1932) as Japanese Lieu De Mémoire.” SPORT IN SOCIETY 14.4 (2011): 430–443. Print.