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Reovirus tenosynovitis in a flock of layer breeders

J De Gussem, H Swam, K Lievens and Peter De Herdt UGent (2010) AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 39(3). p.169-170
abstract
The present paper describes a reovirus infection with clinical course in a flock of layer breeders. Lameness and tenosynovitis of flexor tendons were observed in approximately 15% of the cockerels and 3% of the hens from 17 weeks of age onwards. Affected birds did not die; on the contrary, most of them recovered clinically within a period of 8 weeks. Two other breeds of layer parents that were housed in close contact with the affected flock did not develop clinical signs, although serology indicated that infection with reovirus had taken place. These field observations constitute the first report of clinical reovirus tenosynovitis in layer parents and indicate different susceptibilities of layer parent breeds in developing clinical signs following reovirus infection.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CHICKENS
journal title
AVIAN PATHOLOGY
Avian Pathol.
volume
39
issue
3
pages
169 - 170
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000278665700004
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.967 (2010)
JCR rank
16/145 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0307-9457
DOI
10.1080/03079451003717597
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1849363
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1849363
date created
2011-06-30 14:07:23
date last changed
2011-07-05 15:42:40
@article{1849363,
  abstract     = {The present paper describes a reovirus infection with clinical course in a flock of layer breeders. Lameness and tenosynovitis of flexor tendons were observed in approximately 15\% of the cockerels and 3\% of the hens from 17 weeks of age onwards. Affected birds did not die; on the contrary, most of them recovered clinically within a period of 8 weeks. Two other breeds of layer parents that were housed in close contact with the affected flock did not develop clinical signs, although serology indicated that infection with reovirus had taken place. These field observations constitute the first report of clinical reovirus tenosynovitis in layer parents and indicate different susceptibilities of layer parent breeds in developing clinical signs following reovirus infection.},
  author       = {De Gussem, J and Swam, H and Lievens, K and De Herdt, Peter},
  issn         = {0307-9457},
  journal      = {AVIAN PATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {CHICKENS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {169--170},
  title        = {Reovirus tenosynovitis in a flock of layer breeders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079451003717597},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
De Gussem, J, H Swam, K Lievens, and Peter De Herdt. 2010. “Reovirus Tenosynovitis in a Flock of Layer Breeders.” Avian Pathology 39 (3): 169–170.
APA
De Gussem, J., Swam, H., Lievens, K., & De Herdt, P. (2010). Reovirus tenosynovitis in a flock of layer breeders. AVIAN PATHOLOGY, 39(3), 169–170.
Vancouver
1.
De Gussem J, Swam H, Lievens K, De Herdt P. Reovirus tenosynovitis in a flock of layer breeders. AVIAN PATHOLOGY. 2010;39(3):169–70.
MLA
De Gussem, J, H Swam, K Lievens, et al. “Reovirus Tenosynovitis in a Flock of Layer Breeders.” AVIAN PATHOLOGY 39.3 (2010): 169–170. Print.