Advanced search
1 file | 375.79 KB

Healthy brooders employ more attentional resources when disengaging from the negative: an event-related fMRI study

Author
Organization
Abstract
Depressive brooding is considered a maladaptive ruminative-thinking style that has been shown to be highly correlated with major depression. The present study in healthy participants employed event-related fMRI to uncover the neural underpinnings of emotional disengagement as it relates to depressive brooding. Thirty-four healthy, never depressed individuals performed an emotional go/no-go task with a rapid presentation of emotional faces. We focused on the contrast of inhibiting sad (happy/no-go) versus inhibiting happy (sad/no-go) information. This contrast allowed us to assess possible difficulties in disengaging from emotionally negative, as compared with emotionally positive, faces. At the behavioral level, only in high brooders were higher self-reported brooding scores correlated with more errors when sad information was inhibited, relative to happy information. At the neural level, across all participants, brooding scores were positively correlated with activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; BA 46), implying that high brooders show higher DLPFC involvement when successfully disengaging from a series of negative stimuli. These results may suggest that healthy individuals who report a high brooding thinking style need to recruit more attentional control in order to disengage successfully from negative information, in a way that may be related to emotion regulation strategies. These mechanisms might protect them from developing depressive symptoms.
Keywords
ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, RUMINATIVE RESPONSE STYLE, COGNITIVE CONTROL, EMOTIONAL INFORMATION, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, INHIBITION, DEPRESSION, DISORDERS, SYMPTOMS, Depressive brooding, go/no-go, Emotional disengagement, DLPFC, Emotion regulation

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 375.79 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, Simone Kuehn, and Rudi De Raedt. 2011. “Healthy Brooders Employ More Attentional Resources When Disengaging from the Negative: An Event-related fMRI Study.” Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience 11 (2): 207–216.
APA
Vanderhasselt, M.-A., Kuehn, S., & De Raedt, R. (2011). Healthy brooders employ more attentional resources when disengaging from the negative: an event-related fMRI study. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 11(2), 207–216.
Vancouver
1.
Vanderhasselt M-A, Kuehn S, De Raedt R. Healthy brooders employ more attentional resources when disengaging from the negative: an event-related fMRI study. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 2011;11(2):207–16.
MLA
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, Simone Kuehn, and Rudi De Raedt. “Healthy Brooders Employ More Attentional Resources When Disengaging from the Negative: An Event-related fMRI Study.” COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 11.2 (2011): 207–216. Print.
@article{1848500,
  abstract     = {Depressive brooding is considered a maladaptive ruminative-thinking style that has been shown to be highly correlated with major depression. The present study in healthy participants employed event-related fMRI to uncover the neural underpinnings of emotional disengagement as it relates to depressive brooding. Thirty-four healthy, never depressed individuals performed an emotional go/no-go task with a rapid presentation of emotional faces. We focused on the contrast of inhibiting sad (happy/no-go) versus inhibiting happy (sad/no-go) information. This contrast allowed us to assess possible difficulties in disengaging from emotionally negative, as compared with emotionally positive, faces. At the behavioral level, only in high brooders were higher self-reported brooding scores correlated with more errors when sad information was inhibited, relative to happy information. At the neural level, across all participants, brooding scores were positively correlated with activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; BA 46), implying that high brooders show higher DLPFC involvement when successfully disengaging from a series of negative stimuli. These results may suggest that healthy individuals who report a high brooding thinking style need to recruit more attentional control in order to disengage successfully from negative information, in a way that may be related to emotion regulation strategies. These mechanisms might protect them from developing depressive symptoms.},
  author       = {Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne and Kuehn, Simone and De Raedt, Rudi},
  issn         = {1530-7026},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE},
  keywords     = {ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX,DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX,RUMINATIVE RESPONSE STYLE,COGNITIVE CONTROL,EMOTIONAL INFORMATION,INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES,INHIBITION,DEPRESSION,DISORDERS,SYMPTOMS,Depressive brooding,go/no-go,Emotional disengagement,DLPFC,Emotion regulation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {207--216},
  title        = {Healthy brooders employ more attentional resources when disengaging from the negative: an event-related fMRI study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-011-0022-5},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2011},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: