Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Dual benefit from a belowground symbiosis: nitrogen fixing rhizobia promote growth and defense against a specialist herbivore in a cyanogenic plant

Sylvia Thamer, Martin Schädler, Dries Bonte UGent and Daniel Ballhorn (2011) PLANT AND SOIL. 341(1-2). p.209-219
abstract
Legume-associated nitrogen-fixing bacteria play a key role for plant performance and productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Although this plant-microbe mutualism has been known for decades, studies on effects of rhizobia colonisation on legume-herbivore interactions are scarce. We hypothesized that additional nitrogen provided by rhizobia may increase plant resistance by nitrogen-based defense mechanisms. We studied this below-aboveground interaction using a system consisting of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.), rhizobia, and the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Muls.) as an insect herbivore. We showed that the rhizobial symbiosis not only promotes plant growth but also improves plant defense and resistance against herbivores. Results of our study lead to the suggestion that nitrogen provided by rhizobia is allocated to the production of nitrogen-containing cyanogenic defense compounds, and thereby crucially determines the outcome of plant-herbivore interactions. Our study supports the view that the fitness benefit of root symbioses includes defence mechanisms and thus extends beyond the promotion of plant growth. Since the associations between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems, improved knowledge on rhizobia-mediated effects on plant traitsaEuro center dot and the resulting effects on higher trophic levelsaEuro center dot is important for better understanding of the role of these microbes for ecosystem functioning.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Cyanogenesis, Above-belowground interactions, Ecosystem functions, Legumes, Nitrogen fixation, Symbiosis, ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI, BEAN PHASEOLUS-LUNATUS, COLORADO-POTATO-BEETLE, QUANTITATIVE VARIABILITY, RESOURCE AVAILABILITY, SOIL-MICROORGANISMS, COMMUNITY, HOST, PRODUCTIVITY, GENERALIST
journal title
PLANT AND SOIL
Plant Soil
volume
341
issue
1-2
pages
209 - 219
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000288455300017
JCR category
SOIL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
2.733 (2011)
JCR rank
2/32 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0032-079X
DOI
10.1007/s11104-010-0635-4
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1843229
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1843229
date created
2011-06-28 12:07:29
date last changed
2011-07-04 14:50:42
@article{1843229,
  abstract     = {Legume-associated nitrogen-fixing bacteria play a key role for plant performance and productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Although this plant-microbe mutualism has been known for decades, studies on effects of rhizobia colonisation on legume-herbivore interactions are scarce. We hypothesized that additional nitrogen provided by rhizobia may increase plant resistance by nitrogen-based defense mechanisms. We studied this below-aboveground interaction using a system consisting of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.), rhizobia, and the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Muls.) as an insect herbivore. We showed that the rhizobial symbiosis not only promotes plant growth but also improves plant defense and resistance against herbivores. Results of our study lead to the suggestion that nitrogen provided by rhizobia is allocated to the production of nitrogen-containing cyanogenic defense compounds, and thereby crucially determines the outcome of plant-herbivore interactions. Our study supports the view that the fitness benefit of root symbioses includes defence mechanisms and thus extends beyond the promotion of plant growth. Since the associations between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems, improved knowledge on rhizobia-mediated effects on plant traitsaEuro center dot and the resulting effects on higher trophic levelsaEuro center dot is important for better understanding of the role of these microbes for ecosystem functioning.},
  author       = {Thamer, Sylvia and Sch{\"a}dler, Martin and Bonte, Dries and Ballhorn, Daniel},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  journal      = {PLANT AND SOIL},
  keyword      = {Cyanogenesis,Above-belowground interactions,Ecosystem functions,Legumes,Nitrogen fixation,Symbiosis,ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI,BEAN PHASEOLUS-LUNATUS,COLORADO-POTATO-BEETLE,QUANTITATIVE VARIABILITY,RESOURCE AVAILABILITY,SOIL-MICROORGANISMS,COMMUNITY,HOST,PRODUCTIVITY,GENERALIST},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {209--219},
  title        = {Dual benefit from a belowground symbiosis: nitrogen fixing rhizobia promote growth and defense against a specialist herbivore in a cyanogenic plant},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-010-0635-4},
  volume       = {341},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Thamer, Sylvia, Martin Schädler, Dries Bonte, and Daniel Ballhorn. 2011. “Dual Benefit from a Belowground Symbiosis: Nitrogen Fixing Rhizobia Promote Growth and Defense Against a Specialist Herbivore in a Cyanogenic Plant.” Plant and Soil 341 (1-2): 209–219.
APA
Thamer, S., Schädler, M., Bonte, D., & Ballhorn, D. (2011). Dual benefit from a belowground symbiosis: nitrogen fixing rhizobia promote growth and defense against a specialist herbivore in a cyanogenic plant. PLANT AND SOIL, 341(1-2), 209–219.
Vancouver
1.
Thamer S, Schädler M, Bonte D, Ballhorn D. Dual benefit from a belowground symbiosis: nitrogen fixing rhizobia promote growth and defense against a specialist herbivore in a cyanogenic plant. PLANT AND SOIL. 2011;341(1-2):209–19.
MLA
Thamer, Sylvia, Martin Schädler, Dries Bonte, et al. “Dual Benefit from a Belowground Symbiosis: Nitrogen Fixing Rhizobia Promote Growth and Defense Against a Specialist Herbivore in a Cyanogenic Plant.” PLANT AND SOIL 341.1-2 (2011): 209–219. Print.