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Comparison of the strain-softening behaviour of conventional vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete

Pieter Desnerck (UGent) , Geert De Schutter (UGent) and Luc Taerwe (UGent)
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Abstract
Strain-softening is the phenomenon by which the compressive stress-strain curve presents a descending branch after the peak stress have been reached. For high-strength concrete types it is known that failure occurs in a more brittle way, resulting in a steeper descending branch and a smaller area underneath. Almost no test results are available describing the stress-strain behaviour of self-compacting concrete (a concrete type which needs no additional vibration energy to be compacted). Therefore difference concrete types, self-compacting concretes as well a conventional vibrated concrete are investigated in this study. Uniaxial compressive tests are performed on cylinders. The control signal was adjusted to a combination of the axial and circumferential strain. In This way the total stress-strain curve has been recorded in a stable way. From the results it can be seen that the peak strain corresponding with the compressive strength of the material is higher for self-compacting concrete than for conventional vibrated concrete of the same strength. The descending branch of the stress-strain curve appears to be less steep for SCC resulting in a higher toughness.
Keywords
stress-strain relationship, Strain softening, time dependent hardened properties, self-compacting concrete

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Desnerck, Pieter, Geert De Schutter, and Luc Taerwe. 2010. “Comparison of the Strain-softening Behaviour of Conventional Vibrated Concrete and Self-compacting Concrete.” In Proceedings of the Third International Congress and Exhibition Fib “Think Globally, Build Locally”, 1–10. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Structural engineering.
APA
Desnerck, P., De Schutter, G., & Taerwe, L. (2010). Comparison of the strain-softening behaviour of conventional vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete. Proceedings of the Third International Congress and Exhibition Fib “Think Globally, Build locally” (pp. 1–10). Presented at the The Third International Congress Exhibition : Annual Convention & Bridge Conference : “Think Globally, Build Locally” (FIB - 2010), Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Structural engineering.
Vancouver
1.
Desnerck P, De Schutter G, Taerwe L. Comparison of the strain-softening behaviour of conventional vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete. Proceedings of the Third International Congress and Exhibition Fib “Think Globally, Build locally.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Structural engineering; 2010. p. 1–10.
MLA
Desnerck, Pieter, Geert De Schutter, and Luc Taerwe. “Comparison of the Strain-softening Behaviour of Conventional Vibrated Concrete and Self-compacting Concrete.” Proceedings of the Third International Congress and Exhibition Fib “Think Globally, Build Locally.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Structural engineering, 2010. 1–10. Print.
@inproceedings{1843216,
  abstract     = {Strain-softening is the phenomenon by which the compressive stress-strain curve presents a descending branch after the peak stress have been reached. For high-strength concrete types it is known that failure occurs in a more brittle way, resulting in a steeper descending branch and a smaller area underneath.
Almost no test results are available describing the stress-strain behaviour of self-compacting concrete (a concrete type which needs no additional vibration energy to be compacted). Therefore difference concrete types, self-compacting concretes as well a conventional vibrated concrete are investigated in this study. Uniaxial compressive tests are performed on cylinders. The control signal was adjusted to a combination of the axial and circumferential strain. In This way the total stress-strain curve has been recorded in a stable way. From the results it can be seen that the peak strain corresponding with the compressive strength of the material is higher for self-compacting concrete than for conventional vibrated concrete of the same strength. The descending branch of the stress-strain curve appears to be less steep for SCC resulting in a higher toughness.},
  author       = {Desnerck, Pieter and De Schutter, Geert and Taerwe, Luc},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the Third International Congress and Exhibition Fib 'Think Globally, Build locally'},
  keyword      = {stress-strain relationship,Strain softening,time dependent hardened properties,self-compacting concrete},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Washington, WA, USA},
  pages        = {1--10},
  publisher    = {Ghent University, Department of Structural engineering},
  title        = {Comparison of the strain-softening behaviour of conventional vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete},
  year         = {2010},
}