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Broxaterol increases force output of fatigued canine diaphragm more than salbutamol

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Abstract
We previously demonstrated that broxaterol enhanced recovery of fatigued canine diaphragm. The aim of this study was to compare the inotropic effects of salbutamol and broxaterol on fatigued canine diaphragm. Low-frequency fatigue was induced in 14 mongrel dogs by electrophrenic stimulation, which was continued until transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) at 20 Hz was reduced by 50% or for 1 h. After stabilization of fatigue, the animals received a bolus (18.5 mu g/kg) of either broxaterol or salbutamol, followed by a continuous infusion (0.43 mu g/kg/min). A second bolus of 74.0 mu g/kg, followed by a continuous infusion of 1.72 mu g/kg/min, was given after 90 min. Both drugs significantly increased twitch Pdi. Twitch Pdi measured 90 min after the first and second doses of broxaterol increased by 28 +/- 23% and 42 +/- 34%, respectively, whereas the salbutamol-induced increase was clearly smaller (9 +/- 10% and 17 +/- 15%, respectively). Broxaterol increased Pdi at 20 Hz by 25 +/- 28% with the first dose and by 29 +/- 21% with the second dose. In contrast, salbutamol did not alter Pdi at 20 Hz. Neither drug affected Pdi at 100 Hz. We conclude that broxaterol promoted recovery of low-frequency fatigue of the canine diaphragm in vivo in a dose-dependent manner, whereas salbutamol only minimally improved force production by the fatigued diaphragm.
Keywords
SKELETAL-MUSCLE, MOUSE MUSCLE-FIBERS, BLOOD-FLOW, MECHANISM, CONTRACTILITY, STIMULATION

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MLA
Derom, Eric, Ghislaine Gayan-Ramirez, Giovanni Gurrieri, et al. “Broxaterol Increases Force Output of Fatigued Canine Diaphragm More Than Salbutamol.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE 155.1 (1997): 181–185. Print.
APA
Derom, E., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Gurrieri, G., de Bock, V., & Decramer, M. (1997). Broxaterol increases force output of fatigued canine diaphragm more than salbutamol. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 155(1), 181–185.
Chicago author-date
Derom, Eric, Ghislaine Gayan-Ramirez, Giovanni Gurrieri, Vera de Bock, and Marc Decramer. 1997. “Broxaterol Increases Force Output of Fatigued Canine Diaphragm More Than Salbutamol.” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 155 (1): 181–185.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Derom, Eric, Ghislaine Gayan-Ramirez, Giovanni Gurrieri, Vera de Bock, and Marc Decramer. 1997. “Broxaterol Increases Force Output of Fatigued Canine Diaphragm More Than Salbutamol.” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 155 (1): 181–185.
Vancouver
1.
Derom E, Gayan-Ramirez G, Gurrieri G, de Bock V, Decramer M. Broxaterol increases force output of fatigued canine diaphragm more than salbutamol. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE. 1997;155(1):181–5.
IEEE
[1]
E. Derom, G. Gayan-Ramirez, G. Gurrieri, V. de Bock, and M. Decramer, “Broxaterol increases force output of fatigued canine diaphragm more than salbutamol,” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, vol. 155, no. 1, pp. 181–185, 1997.
@article{181619,
  abstract     = {We previously demonstrated that broxaterol enhanced recovery of fatigued canine diaphragm. The aim of this study was to compare the inotropic effects of salbutamol and broxaterol on fatigued canine diaphragm. Low-frequency fatigue was induced in 14 mongrel dogs by electrophrenic stimulation, which was continued until transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) at 20 Hz was reduced by 50% or for 1 h. After stabilization of fatigue, the animals received a bolus (18.5 mu g/kg) of either broxaterol or salbutamol, followed by a continuous infusion (0.43 mu g/kg/min). A second bolus of 74.0 mu g/kg, followed by a continuous infusion of 1.72 mu g/kg/min, was given after 90 min. Both drugs significantly increased twitch Pdi. Twitch Pdi measured 90 min after the first and second doses of broxaterol increased by 28 +/- 23% and 42 +/- 34%, respectively, whereas the salbutamol-induced increase was clearly smaller (9 +/- 10% and 17 +/- 15%, respectively). Broxaterol increased Pdi at 20 Hz by 25 +/- 28% with the first dose and by 29 +/- 21% with the second dose. In contrast, salbutamol did not alter Pdi at 20 Hz. Neither drug affected Pdi at 100 Hz. We conclude that broxaterol promoted recovery of low-frequency fatigue of the canine diaphragm in vivo in a dose-dependent manner, whereas salbutamol only minimally improved force production by the fatigued diaphragm.},
  author       = {Derom, Eric and Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine and Gurrieri, Giovanni and de Bock, Vera and Decramer, Marc},
  issn         = {1073-449X},
  journal      = {AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE},
  keywords     = {SKELETAL-MUSCLE,MOUSE MUSCLE-FIBERS,BLOOD-FLOW,MECHANISM,CONTRACTILITY,STIMULATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {181--185},
  title        = {Broxaterol increases force output of fatigued canine diaphragm more than salbutamol},
  url          = {http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/155/1/181},
  volume       = {155},
  year         = {1997},
}