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Comparison of computer-controlled administration of propofol with two manually controlled infusion techniques

Michel Struys UGent, Linda Versichelen, Olivier Thas UGent, Luc Herregods UGent and Georges Rolly (1997) ANAESTHESIA. 52(1). p.41-50
abstract
Ninety women were studied in order to compare dose requirements and quality of anaesthesia between target-controlled infusion and two manually controlled infusion schemes for propofol administration: group I received target-controlled infusion for induction (4 mu g.ml(-1) target blood concentration, increased by 2 mu g.ml(-1) after 3 min if consciousness not lost), groups II and III received an induction bolus of propofol at infusion rates of 1200 or 600 ml.h(-1), respectively, until loss of consciousness. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol target-controlled infusion in group I or by constant rate infusion in the other two groups. Computer simulations were used to calculate blood and effect-site propofol concentrations. Mean induction times (SD) were 78 (65) s in group I versus 51 (10) s and 62 (12) s in groups II and III, respectively (p < 0.05 between groups II and III). Mean induction doses were: 1.31 (0.44), 2.74 (0.56) and 1.77 (0.43) mg.kg(-1) and mean maintenance doses were 13.4 (3.55), 9.32 (1.71) and 9.97 (1.53) mg.kg(-1).h(-1) in groups I, II and III, respectively (p < 0.05 between all groups). There was a lower incidence of apnoea in group I than in groups II and III. There were no significant differences between the groups in other objective parameters of anaesthetic quality studied. Computer simulations showed an 'overshoot' in propofol blood and effect-site concentration with manual induction and significantly higher maintenance levels with target-controlled infusion.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SYSTEM, anaesthetics, INDUCTION, GENERAL-ANESTHESIA, TARGET-CONTROLLED INFUSION, intravenous, anaesthetic techniques, propofol
journal title
ANAESTHESIA
Anaesthesia
volume
52
issue
1
pages
41 - 50
Web of Science type
Article
ISSN
0003-2409
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2044.1997.002-az001.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
181565
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-181565
date created
2004-01-14 13:41:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:23
@article{181565,
  abstract     = {Ninety women were studied in order to compare dose requirements and quality of anaesthesia between target-controlled infusion and two manually controlled infusion schemes for propofol administration: group I received target-controlled infusion for induction (4 mu g.ml(-1) target blood concentration, increased by 2 mu g.ml(-1) after 3 min if consciousness not lost), groups II and III received an induction bolus of propofol at infusion rates of 1200 or 600 ml.h(-1), respectively, until loss of consciousness. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol target-controlled infusion in group I or by constant rate infusion in the other two groups. Computer simulations were used to calculate blood and effect-site propofol concentrations. Mean induction times (SD) were 78 (65) s in group I versus 51 (10) s and 62 (12) s in groups II and III, respectively (p {\textlangle} 0.05 between groups II and III). Mean induction doses were: 1.31 (0.44), 2.74 (0.56) and 1.77 (0.43) mg.kg(-1) and mean maintenance doses were 13.4 (3.55), 9.32 (1.71) and 9.97 (1.53) mg.kg(-1).h(-1) in groups I, II and III, respectively (p {\textlangle} 0.05 between all groups). There was a lower incidence of apnoea in group I than in groups II and III. There were no significant differences between the groups in other objective parameters of anaesthetic quality studied. Computer simulations showed an 'overshoot' in propofol blood and effect-site concentration with manual induction and significantly higher maintenance levels with target-controlled infusion.},
  author       = {Struys, Michel and Versichelen, Linda and Thas, Olivier and Herregods, Luc and Rolly, Georges},
  issn         = {0003-2409},
  journal      = {ANAESTHESIA},
  keyword      = {SYSTEM,anaesthetics,INDUCTION,GENERAL-ANESTHESIA,TARGET-CONTROLLED INFUSION,intravenous,anaesthetic techniques,propofol},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {41--50},
  title        = {Comparison of computer-controlled administration of propofol with two manually controlled infusion techniques},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2044.1997.002-az001.x},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {1997},
}

Chicago
Struys, Michel, Linda Versichelen, Olivier Thas, Luc Herregods, and Georges Rolly. 1997. “Comparison of Computer-controlled Administration of Propofol with Two Manually Controlled Infusion Techniques.” Anaesthesia 52 (1): 41–50.
APA
Struys, M., Versichelen, L., Thas, O., Herregods, L., & Rolly, G. (1997). Comparison of computer-controlled administration of propofol with two manually controlled infusion techniques. ANAESTHESIA, 52(1), 41–50.
Vancouver
1.
Struys M, Versichelen L, Thas O, Herregods L, Rolly G. Comparison of computer-controlled administration of propofol with two manually controlled infusion techniques. ANAESTHESIA. 1997;52(1):41–50.
MLA
Struys, Michel, Linda Versichelen, Olivier Thas, et al. “Comparison of Computer-controlled Administration of Propofol with Two Manually Controlled Infusion Techniques.” ANAESTHESIA 52.1 (1997): 41–50. Print.