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A known technique for meniscal repair in common practice

Frank Plasschaert (UGent) , Bruno Vandekerckhove (UGent) and René Verdonk (UGent)
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Abstract
In this retrospective study, we calculated the healing rate of meniscal repairs performed with an outside-in technique. We describe complications encountered and evaluate some known criteria used in the decision to perform a meniscal repair instead of partial meniscectomy. Included is a brief description of the surgical technique and of the trauma type and the meniscal lesions that were repaired. The technique has a high degree of success (74% of the meniscal repairs survived during a mean follow-up of 3.5 years). Although there is a 25% complication rate, no serious or permanent complications were added by repairing menisci instead of performing a partial meniscectomy. For this reason we think saving even a relatively low percentage of menisci may be worthwhile. We can also conclude that an anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee that is stable can still have a good result in meniscal repair, without performing cruciate reconstruction. In each case, however, individual patient issues such as age, activity level, and associated lesions have to be considered.
Keywords
outside-in, meniscal repair, survival, criteria, TEARS, KNEE, MICROVASCULATURE, MENISCECTOMY

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Chicago
Plasschaert, Frank, Bruno Vandekerckhove, and René Verdonk. 1998. “A Known Technique for Meniscal Repair in Common Practice.” Arthroscopy-the Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 14 (8): 863–868.
APA
Plasschaert, Frank, Vandekerckhove, B., & Verdonk, R. (1998). A known technique for meniscal repair in common practice. ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY, 14(8), 863–868.
Vancouver
1.
Plasschaert F, Vandekerckhove B, Verdonk R. A known technique for meniscal repair in common practice. ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY. 1998;14(8):863–8.
MLA
Plasschaert, Frank, Bruno Vandekerckhove, and René Verdonk. “A Known Technique for Meniscal Repair in Common Practice.” ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY 14.8 (1998): 863–868. Print.
@article{180780,
  abstract     = {In this retrospective study, we calculated the healing rate of meniscal repairs performed with an outside-in technique. We describe complications encountered and evaluate some known criteria used in the decision to perform a meniscal repair instead of partial meniscectomy. Included is a brief description of the surgical technique and of the trauma type and the meniscal lesions that were repaired. The technique has a high degree of success (74\% of the meniscal repairs survived during a mean follow-up of 3.5 years). Although there is a 25\% complication rate, no serious or permanent complications were added by repairing menisci instead of performing a partial meniscectomy. For this reason we think saving even a relatively low percentage of menisci may be worthwhile. We can also conclude that an anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee that is stable can still have a good result in meniscal repair, without performing cruciate reconstruction. In each case, however, individual patient issues such as age, activity level, and associated lesions have to be considered.},
  author       = {Plasschaert, Frank and Vandekerckhove, Bruno and Verdonk, Ren{\'e}},
  issn         = {0749-8063},
  journal      = {ARTHROSCOPY-THE JOURNAL OF ARTHROSCOPIC AND RELATED SURGERY},
  keyword      = {outside-in,meniscal repair,survival,criteria,TEARS,KNEE,MICROVASCULATURE,MENISCECTOMY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {863--868},
  title        = {A known technique for meniscal repair in common practice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0749-8063(98)70024-6},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {1998},
}

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