Advanced search
1 file | 352.18 KB

Charge characteristics in relation to free iron and organic matter of soils from Bambouto mountains, western Cameroon

Author
Organization
Abstract
We have examined the charge characteristics, with special emphasis on the role of free Fe and organic matter, of humid tropical soils from Bambouto Mountains, Western Cameroon. The soils, which are formed from tuff, basalt and trachyte, are dominated by kaolinite and sesquioxides. The amounts of Fe oxides in them increase somewhat with depth. Open 2:1 phyllosilicates are present in trace amounts. The point of zero charge of the variable charge components, pH(0), is around 4 in the topsoil (0-20 cm) and around 6 at 100-150 cm depth. In the subsoils, pH(0) exceeds soil pH presumably because of large quantities of Fe oxides. Deferration increases both soil pH and PH0, but diminishes the anion exchange capacity. Oxides and oxyhydrates of Fe have positive surface charge, so their removal from the soils would result in overall loss of positive charge. Increases in soil pH would bring about an increase in the cation exchange capacity of the soils. Hence, management practices that reduce soil acidity should reduce loss of essential basic cations via leaching.
Keywords
POINT, TROPICAL SOILS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 352.18 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Ranst, Eric, J Shamshuddin, Geert Baert, and PK Dzwowa. 1998. “Charge Characteristics in Relation to Free Iron and Organic Matter of Soils from Bambouto Mountains, Western Cameroon.” European Journal of Soil Science 49 (2): 243–252.
APA
Van Ranst, E., Shamshuddin, J., Baert, G., & Dzwowa, P. (1998). Charge characteristics in relation to free iron and organic matter of soils from Bambouto mountains, western Cameroon. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE, 49(2), 243–252.
Vancouver
1.
Van Ranst E, Shamshuddin J, Baert G, Dzwowa P. Charge characteristics in relation to free iron and organic matter of soils from Bambouto mountains, western Cameroon. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE. 1998;49(2):243–52.
MLA
Van Ranst, Eric, J Shamshuddin, Geert Baert, et al. “Charge Characteristics in Relation to Free Iron and Organic Matter of Soils from Bambouto Mountains, Western Cameroon.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE 49.2 (1998): 243–252. Print.
@article{178513,
  abstract     = {We have examined the charge characteristics, with special emphasis on the role of free Fe and organic matter, of humid tropical soils from Bambouto Mountains, Western Cameroon. The soils, which are formed from tuff, basalt and trachyte, are dominated by kaolinite and sesquioxides. The amounts of Fe oxides in them increase somewhat with depth. Open 2:1 phyllosilicates are present in trace amounts. The point of zero charge of the variable charge components, pH(0), is around 4 in the topsoil (0-20 cm) and around 6 at 100-150 cm depth. In the subsoils, pH(0) exceeds soil pH presumably because of large quantities of Fe oxides. Deferration increases both soil pH and PH0, but diminishes the anion exchange capacity. Oxides and oxyhydrates of Fe have positive surface charge, so their removal from the soils would result in overall loss of positive charge. Increases in soil pH would bring about an increase in the cation exchange capacity of the soils. Hence, management practices that reduce soil acidity should reduce loss of essential basic cations via leaching.},
  author       = {Van Ranst, Eric and Shamshuddin, J and Baert, Geert and Dzwowa, PK},
  issn         = {1351-0754},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {POINT,TROPICAL SOILS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {243--252},
  title        = {Charge characteristics in relation to free iron and organic matter of soils from Bambouto mountains, western Cameroon},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2389.1998.00159.x},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {1998},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: