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Factors influencing long term persistence of sinus rhythm after a first electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation

Mattias Duytschaever UGent, Filomeen Haerynck UGent, René Tavernier UGent and Luc Jordaens UGent (1998) PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY. 21(1). p.284-287
abstract
If is conventionally thought that electrical cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) of longstanding duration or with a large left atrial diameter only seldom results in long term success. Recurrence is common, although antiarrhythmic drugs often effectively decrease the number and duration of recurrent AF episodes. We analysed clinical, functional and pharmacological variables which could possibly influence the long term outcome after a first electrical cardioversion for AF in a retrospective study on 85 patients. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify factors predicting maintenance of sinus rhythm at 100 days, and absence of recurrence during the entire follow-up. In univariate analysis, the only significant predictor for maintenance of sinus rhythm at 100 days was the duration of the preceding AF episode. Multivariate analysis with persistence of sinus rhythm at 100 days as endpoint confirmed this as a prognostic factor (p < 0.03), but sotalol treatment also contributed to maintenance of signals rhythm (p < 0.05). When considering the entire observation period, class III antiarrhythmic drugs, i.e. sotalol and amiodarone, were useful in preventing recurrence (p < 0.01 and < 0.02). High age (above 75 years) was a predictor of recurrence. In conclusion, class III antiarrhythmic drugs, the duration of atrial fibrillation and high age were the most important determinants of long term outcome, while echocardiographic parameters and the presence of heart disease played no role.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (proceedingsPaper)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
atrial fibrillation, amiodarone, electrical cardioversion, treatment outcome, sotalol, MAINTENANCE, FLUTTER, EFFICACY, THERAPY, MANAGEMENT, AMIODARONE, QUINIDINE
journal title
PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY
PACE-Pacing Clin. Electrophysiol.
volume
21
issue
1
pages
284 - 287
conference name
Europace 97
conference location
Athens, Greece
conference start
1997-06-08
conference end
1997-06-11
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000071628900030
ISSN
0147-8389
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-8159.1998.tb01105.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
176439
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-176439
date created
2004-01-14 13:40:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:08
@article{176439,
  abstract     = {If is conventionally thought that electrical cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) of longstanding duration or with a large left atrial diameter only seldom results in long term success. Recurrence is common, although antiarrhythmic drugs often effectively decrease the number and duration of recurrent AF episodes. We analysed clinical, functional and pharmacological variables which could possibly influence the long term outcome after a first electrical cardioversion for AF in a retrospective study on 85 patients. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify factors predicting maintenance of sinus rhythm at 100 days, and absence of recurrence during the entire follow-up. In univariate analysis, the only significant predictor for maintenance of sinus rhythm at 100 days was the duration of the preceding AF episode. Multivariate analysis with persistence of sinus rhythm at 100 days as endpoint confirmed this as a prognostic factor (p {\textlangle} 0.03), but sotalol treatment also contributed to maintenance of signals rhythm (p {\textlangle} 0.05). When considering the entire observation period, class III antiarrhythmic drugs, i.e. sotalol and amiodarone, were useful in preventing recurrence (p {\textlangle} 0.01 and {\textlangle} 0.02). High age (above 75 years) was a predictor of recurrence. In conclusion, class III antiarrhythmic drugs, the duration of atrial fibrillation and high age were the most important determinants of long term outcome, while echocardiographic parameters and the presence of heart disease played no role.},
  author       = {Duytschaever, Mattias and Haerynck, Filomeen and Tavernier, Ren{\'e} and Jordaens, Luc},
  issn         = {0147-8389},
  journal      = {PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {atrial fibrillation,amiodarone,electrical cardioversion,treatment outcome,sotalol,MAINTENANCE,FLUTTER,EFFICACY,THERAPY,MANAGEMENT,AMIODARONE,QUINIDINE},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Athens, Greece},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {284--287},
  title        = {Factors influencing long term persistence of sinus rhythm after a first electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8159.1998.tb01105.x},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {1998},
}

Chicago
Duytschaever, Mattias, FILOMEEN HAERYNCK, René Tavernier, and Luc Jordaens. 1998. “Factors Influencing Long Term Persistence of Sinus Rhythm After a First Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation.” Pace-pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology 21 (1): 284–287.
APA
Duytschaever, M., HAERYNCK, F., Tavernier, R., & Jordaens, L. (1998). Factors influencing long term persistence of sinus rhythm after a first electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, 21(1), 284–287. Presented at the Europace 97.
Vancouver
1.
Duytschaever M, HAERYNCK F, Tavernier R, Jordaens L. Factors influencing long term persistence of sinus rhythm after a first electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY. 1998;21(1):284–7.
MLA
Duytschaever, Mattias, FILOMEEN HAERYNCK, René Tavernier, et al. “Factors Influencing Long Term Persistence of Sinus Rhythm After a First Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation.” PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY 21.1 (1998): 284–287. Print.