Advanced search
1 file | 104.71 KB

HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to guarantee safe water reuse and drinking water production: a case study

(2001) WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 43(12). p.31-38
Author
Organization
Abstract
To obtain a sustainable water catchment in the dune area of the Flemish west coast, the integration of treated domestic wastewater in the existing potable water production process is planned. The hygienic hazards associated with the introduction of treated domestic wastewater into the water cycle are well recognised. Therefore, the concept of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) was used to guarantee hygienically safe drinking water production. Taking into account the literature data on the removal efficiencies of the proposed advanced treatment steps with regard to enteric viruses and protozoa and after setting high quality limits based on the recent progress in quantitative risk assessment, the critical control points (CCPs) and points of attention (POAs) were identified. Based on the HACCP analysis a specific monitoring strategy was developed which focused on the control of these CCPs and POAs.
Keywords
HACCP, drinking water, monitoring, protozoa, viruses, water reuse, REVERSE-OSMOSIS, VIRUS REMOVAL, MICROFILTRATION, MEMBRANES

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 104.71 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Dewettinck, Tom, E Van Houtte, D Geenens, Kris Van Hege, and Willy Verstraete. 2001. “HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to Guarantee Safe Water Reuse and Drinking Water Production: a Case Study.” Water Science and Technology 43 (12): 31–38.
APA
Dewettinck, T., Van Houtte, E., Geenens, D., Van Hege, K., & Verstraete, W. (2001). HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to guarantee safe water reuse and drinking water production: a case study. WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 43(12), 31–38. Presented at the 10th International Symposium on Health-Related Water Microbiology.
Vancouver
1.
Dewettinck T, Van Houtte E, Geenens D, Van Hege K, Verstraete W. HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to guarantee safe water reuse and drinking water production: a case study. WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 2001;43(12):31–8.
MLA
Dewettinck, Tom, E Van Houtte, D Geenens, et al. “HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to Guarantee Safe Water Reuse and Drinking Water Production: a Case Study.” WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 43.12 (2001): 31–38. Print.
@article{169371,
  abstract     = {To obtain a sustainable water catchment in the dune area of the Flemish west coast, the integration of treated domestic wastewater in the existing potable water production process is planned. The hygienic hazards associated with the introduction of treated domestic wastewater into the water cycle are well recognised. Therefore, the concept of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) was used to guarantee hygienically safe drinking water production. Taking into account the literature data on the removal efficiencies of the proposed advanced treatment steps with regard to enteric viruses and protozoa and after setting high quality limits based on the recent progress in quantitative risk assessment, the critical control points (CCPs) and points of attention (POAs) were identified. Based on the HACCP analysis a specific monitoring strategy was developed which focused on the control of these CCPs and POAs.},
  author       = {Dewettinck, Tom and Van Houtte, E and Geenens, D and Van Hege, Kris and Verstraete, Willy},
  issn         = {0273-1223},
  journal      = {WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {HACCP,drinking water,monitoring,protozoa,viruses,water reuse,REVERSE-OSMOSIS,VIRUS REMOVAL,MICROFILTRATION,MEMBRANES},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Paris, France},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {31--38},
  title        = {HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to guarantee safe water reuse and drinking water production: a case study},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2001},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: