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Cardiovascular risk in white-coat and sustained hypertensive patients

H Celis, JA Staessen, L Thijs, F Buntinx, Marc De Buyzere, E Den Hond, RH Fagard and ET O'Brien (2002) BLOOD PRESSURE. 11(6). p.352-356
abstract
We compared cardiovascular outcome between patients with white-coat and sustained hypertension who had previously participated in the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and Treatment of Hypertension (APTH) trial. Baseline characteristics, including office and ambulatory blood pressure (BP), were measured during the 2-month run-in period of the APTH trial. During follow-up, information on the occurrence of major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure), achieved office BP and treatment status was obtained. At entry, 326 patients had sustained hypertension (daytime ambulatory BP greater than or equal to140 mmHg systolic and/or greater than or equal to90 mmHg diastolic) and 93 had daytime ambulatory BP below these limits and were classified as white-coat hypertensives. During 2088 patient-years of follow-up (median follow-up 5.3 years), all major cardiovascular events (n = 22) occurred in the patients with sustained hypertension (rate 12.7 per 1000 patient-years, p = 0.02 for between-group difference). Furthermore, multiple Cox regression confirmed that after adjustment for important covariables, daytime ambulatory BP - but not office BP at entry - significantly and independently predicted cardiovascular outcome. After additional adjustment for office BP, daytime ambulatory BP still predicted the occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Although white-coat hypertension was less frequently associated with anti hypertensive drug treatment during follow-up, it carried a significantly better prognosis than sustained hypertension.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SYSTOLIC HYPERTENSION, AMBULATORY BLOOD-PRESSURE, PROGNOSTIC VALUE, OLDER PATIENTS, PREDICTION, TRIAL, ATHEROSCLEROSIS, MORTALITY, DAMAGE, APTH, ambulatory blood pressure, cardiovascular risk, office blood pressure, sustained hypertension, white-coat hypertension
journal title
BLOOD PRESSURE
Blood Pressure
volume
11
issue
6
pages
352 - 356
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000180168900006
JCR category
PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE
JCR impact factor
1.344 (2002)
JCR rank
29/51 (2002)
JCR quartile
3 (2002)
ISSN
0803-7051
DOI
10.1080/080370502321095311
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
164236
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-164236
date created
2004-01-14 13:39:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:22
@article{164236,
  abstract     = {We compared cardiovascular outcome between patients with white-coat and sustained hypertension who had previously participated in the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and Treatment of Hypertension (APTH) trial. Baseline characteristics, including office and ambulatory blood pressure (BP), were measured during the 2-month run-in period of the APTH trial. During follow-up, information on the occurrence of major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure), achieved office BP and treatment status was obtained. At entry, 326 patients had sustained hypertension (daytime ambulatory BP greater than or equal to140 mmHg systolic and/or greater than or equal to90 mmHg diastolic) and 93 had daytime ambulatory BP below these limits and were classified as white-coat hypertensives. During 2088 patient-years of follow-up (median follow-up 5.3 years), all major cardiovascular events (n = 22) occurred in the patients with sustained hypertension (rate 12.7 per 1000 patient-years, p = 0.02 for between-group difference). Furthermore, multiple Cox regression confirmed that after adjustment for important covariables, daytime ambulatory BP - but not office BP at entry - significantly and independently predicted cardiovascular outcome. After additional adjustment for office BP, daytime ambulatory BP still predicted the occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Although white-coat hypertension was less frequently associated with anti hypertensive drug treatment during follow-up, it carried a significantly better prognosis than sustained hypertension.},
  author       = {Celis, H and Staessen, JA and Thijs, L and Buntinx, F and De Buyzere, Marc and Den Hond, E and Fagard, RH and O'Brien, ET},
  issn         = {0803-7051},
  journal      = {BLOOD PRESSURE},
  keyword      = {SYSTOLIC HYPERTENSION,AMBULATORY BLOOD-PRESSURE,PROGNOSTIC VALUE,OLDER PATIENTS,PREDICTION,TRIAL,ATHEROSCLEROSIS,MORTALITY,DAMAGE,APTH,ambulatory blood pressure,cardiovascular risk,office blood pressure,sustained hypertension,white-coat hypertension},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {352--356},
  title        = {Cardiovascular risk in white-coat and sustained hypertensive patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/080370502321095311},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2002},
}

Chicago
Celis, H, JA Staessen, L Thijs, F Buntinx, MARC DE BUYZERE, E Den Hond, RH Fagard, and ET O’Brien. 2002. “Cardiovascular Risk in White-coat and Sustained Hypertensive Patients.” Blood Pressure 11 (6): 352–356.
APA
Celis, H, Staessen, J., Thijs, L., Buntinx, F., DE BUYZERE, M., Den Hond, E., Fagard, R., et al. (2002). Cardiovascular risk in white-coat and sustained hypertensive patients. BLOOD PRESSURE, 11(6), 352–356.
Vancouver
1.
Celis H, Staessen J, Thijs L, Buntinx F, DE BUYZERE M, Den Hond E, et al. Cardiovascular risk in white-coat and sustained hypertensive patients. BLOOD PRESSURE. 2002;11(6):352–6.
MLA
Celis, H, JA Staessen, L Thijs, et al. “Cardiovascular Risk in White-coat and Sustained Hypertensive Patients.” BLOOD PRESSURE 11.6 (2002): 352–356. Print.