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Genetic differentiation among three neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) populations within the Brazilian Atlantic rain forest

R Margis, D Felix, JF Caldas, F Salgueiro, DSD De Araujo, Peter Breyne UGent, Marc Van Montagu UGent, Dulce De Oliveira UGent and M Margis-Pinheiro (2002) BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION. 11(1). p.149-163
abstract
Eugenia uniflora L. (pitanga) is widely distributed in tropical areas. It is present in coastal vegetation from Ceara, in northeastern Brazil, to Rio Grande do Sul, at the southern tip of the country. Eugenia uniflora is of ecological importance, both as colonizing species on disturbed land and as food supplier for a wide variety of insects, birds and mammals. Pitanga plays a role in the maintenance of shrubby coastal ecosystems, especially at disturbed sites, and in 'restinga' ecosystems, at the interface between low forest and strand vegetation. To investigate the genetic diversity residing within the species, three neighboring populations at a distance of less than 24 km from each other, with varying degrees of human impact, were studied. The level of genetic diversity within and between populations was assessed with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methodology. A total of 532 AFLP markers were analyzed in 66 individual trees. The polymorphism level varied from 61.2 to 96% depending on the primer combination used. Intra- and inter-population genetic diversity analysis showed that more than 88% of the variation resided within the populations, with a G(st) of 0.123. Nevertheless, using neighbor joining (NJ) and principal component analysis (PCA), on the genetic distance (GD) data, permitted the three analyzed populations to be differentiated.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ALLOZYME, DISPERSAL, BIODIVERSITY, DNA, DIVERSITY, RAPD MARKERS, CONSERVATION GENETICS, LENGTH POLYMORPHISM AFLP, population genetics, myrtaceae, genetic diversity, AFLP, biodiversity
journal title
BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION
Biodivers. Conserv.
volume
11
issue
1
pages
149 - 163
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000173702400010
JCR category
BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION
JCR impact factor
0.781 (2002)
JCR rank
9/20 (2002)
JCR quartile
2 (2002)
ISSN
0960-3115
DOI
10.1023/A:1014028026273
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
153956
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-153956
date created
2004-01-14 13:39:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:18
@article{153956,
  abstract     = {Eugenia uniflora L. (pitanga) is widely distributed in tropical areas. It is present in coastal vegetation from Ceara, in northeastern Brazil, to Rio Grande do Sul, at the southern tip of the country. Eugenia uniflora is of ecological importance, both as colonizing species on disturbed land and as food supplier for a wide variety of insects, birds and mammals. Pitanga plays a role in the maintenance of shrubby coastal ecosystems, especially at disturbed sites, and in 'restinga' ecosystems, at the interface between low forest and strand vegetation. To investigate the genetic diversity residing within the species, three neighboring populations at a distance of less than 24 km from each other, with varying degrees of human impact, were studied. The level of genetic diversity within and between populations was assessed with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methodology. A total of 532 AFLP markers were analyzed in 66 individual trees. The polymorphism level varied from 61.2 to 96\% depending on the primer combination used. Intra- and inter-population genetic diversity analysis showed that more than 88\% of the variation resided within the populations, with a G(st) of 0.123. Nevertheless, using neighbor joining (NJ) and principal component analysis (PCA), on the genetic distance (GD) data, permitted the three analyzed populations to be differentiated.},
  author       = {Margis, R and Felix, D and Caldas, JF and Salgueiro, F and De Araujo, DSD and Breyne, Peter and Van Montagu, Marc and De Oliveira, Dulce and Margis-Pinheiro, M},
  issn         = {0960-3115},
  journal      = {BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION},
  keyword      = {ALLOZYME,DISPERSAL,BIODIVERSITY,DNA,DIVERSITY,RAPD MARKERS,CONSERVATION GENETICS,LENGTH POLYMORPHISM AFLP,population genetics,myrtaceae,genetic diversity,AFLP,biodiversity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {149--163},
  title        = {Genetic differentiation among three neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) populations within the Brazilian Atlantic rain forest},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014028026273},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2002},
}

Chicago
Margis, R, D Felix, JF Caldas, F Salgueiro, DSD De Araujo, Peter Breyne, Marc Van Montagu, Dulce De Oliveira, and M Margis-Pinheiro. 2002. “Genetic Differentiation Among Three Neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia Uniflora L.) Populations Within the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest.” Biodiversity and Conservation 11 (1): 149–163.
APA
Margis, R., Felix, D., Caldas, J., Salgueiro, F., De Araujo, D., Breyne, P., Van Montagu, M., et al. (2002). Genetic differentiation among three neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) populations within the Brazilian Atlantic rain forest. BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION, 11(1), 149–163.
Vancouver
1.
Margis R, Felix D, Caldas J, Salgueiro F, De Araujo D, Breyne P, et al. Genetic differentiation among three neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) populations within the Brazilian Atlantic rain forest. BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION. 2002;11(1):149–63.
MLA
Margis, R, D Felix, JF Caldas, et al. “Genetic Differentiation Among Three Neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia Uniflora L.) Populations Within the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest.” BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION 11.1 (2002): 149–163. Print.