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Molecular characterization of plant ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes belonging to the UbcP4/E2-C/UBCx/UbcH10 gene family

Marie Claire Criqui, Janice de Almeida Engler UGent, Alain Camasses, Arnaud Capron, Yves Parmentier, Dirk Inzé UGent and Pascal Genschik (2002) PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 130(3). p.1230-1240
abstract
The anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome is the ubiquitin-ligase that targets destruction box-containing proteins for proteolysis during the cell cycle. Anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome and its activator (the fizzy and fizzy-related) proteins work together with ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (UBCs) (E2s). One class of E2s (called E2-C) seems specifically involved in cyclin B1 degradation. Although it has recently been shown that mammalian E2-C is regulated at the protein level during the cell cycle, not much is known concerning the expression of these genes. Arabidopsis encodes two genes belonging to the E2-C gene family (called UBC19 and UBC20). We found that UBC19 is able to complement fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) UbcP4-140 mutant, indicating that the plant protein can functionally replace its yeast ortholog for protein degradation during mitosis. In situ hybridization experiments were performed to study the expression of the E2-C genes in various tissues of plants. Their transcripts were always, but not exclusively, found in tissues active for cell division. Thus, the UBC19/20 E2s may have a key function during cell cycle, but may also be involved in ubiquitylation reactions occurring during differentiation and/or in differentiated cells. Finally, we showed that a translational fusion protein between UBC19 and green fluorescent protein localized both in the cytosol and the nucleus in stable transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow 2) cells.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CYCLE-DEPENDENT PROTEOLYSIS, ANAPHASE-PROMOTING COMPLEX, CELL-CYCLE, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, FISSION YEAST, SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE, DESTRUCTION MACHINERY, MEDIATED PROTEOLYSIS, MITOTIC CYCLINS, S-PHASE
journal title
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Plant Physiol.
volume
130
issue
3
pages
1230 - 1240
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000179329400017
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
5.8 (2002)
JCR rank
6/134 (2002)
JCR quartile
1 (2002)
ISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.011353
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
153831
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-153831
date created
2004-01-14 13:38:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:18
@article{153831,
  abstract     = {The anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome is the ubiquitin-ligase that targets destruction box-containing proteins for proteolysis during the cell cycle. Anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome and its activator (the fizzy and fizzy-related) proteins work together with ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (UBCs) (E2s). One class of E2s (called E2-C) seems specifically involved in cyclin B1 degradation. Although it has recently been shown that mammalian E2-C is regulated at the protein level during the cell cycle, not much is known concerning the expression of these genes. Arabidopsis encodes two genes belonging to the E2-C gene family (called UBC19 and UBC20). We found that UBC19 is able to complement fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) UbcP4-140 mutant, indicating that the plant protein can functionally replace its yeast ortholog for protein degradation during mitosis. In situ hybridization experiments were performed to study the expression of the E2-C genes in various tissues of plants. Their transcripts were always, but not exclusively, found in tissues active for cell division. Thus, the UBC19/20 E2s may have a key function during cell cycle, but may also be involved in ubiquitylation reactions occurring during differentiation and/or in differentiated cells. Finally, we showed that a translational fusion protein between UBC19 and green fluorescent protein localized both in the cytosol and the nucleus in stable transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow 2) cells.},
  author       = {Criqui, Marie Claire and de Almeida Engler, Janice and Camasses, Alain and Capron, Arnaud and Parmentier, Yves and Inz{\'e}, Dirk and Genschik, Pascal},
  issn         = {0032-0889},
  journal      = {PLANT PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {CYCLE-DEPENDENT PROTEOLYSIS,ANAPHASE-PROMOTING COMPLEX,CELL-CYCLE,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,FISSION YEAST,SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE,DESTRUCTION MACHINERY,MEDIATED PROTEOLYSIS,MITOTIC CYCLINS,S-PHASE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1230--1240},
  title        = {Molecular characterization of plant ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes belonging to the UbcP4/E2-C/UBCx/UbcH10 gene family},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.011353},
  volume       = {130},
  year         = {2002},
}

Chicago
Criqui, Marie Claire, Janice de Almeida Engler, Alain Camasses, Arnaud Capron, Yves Parmentier, Dirk Inzé, and Pascal Genschik. 2002. “Molecular Characterization of Plant Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzymes Belonging to the UbcP4/E2-C/UBCx/UbcH10 Gene Family.” Plant Physiology 130 (3): 1230–1240.
APA
Criqui, M. C., de Almeida Engler, J., Camasses, A., Capron, A., Parmentier, Y., Inzé, D., & Genschik, P. (2002). Molecular characterization of plant ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes belonging to the UbcP4/E2-C/UBCx/UbcH10 gene family. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, 130(3), 1230–1240.
Vancouver
1.
Criqui MC, de Almeida Engler J, Camasses A, Capron A, Parmentier Y, Inzé D, et al. Molecular characterization of plant ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes belonging to the UbcP4/E2-C/UBCx/UbcH10 gene family. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 2002;130(3):1230–40.
MLA
Criqui, Marie Claire, Janice de Almeida Engler, Alain Camasses, et al. “Molecular Characterization of Plant Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzymes Belonging to the UbcP4/E2-C/UBCx/UbcH10 Gene Family.” PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 130.3 (2002): 1230–1240. Print.