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Stimulus-feature specific negative priming

(2001) MEMORY & COGNITION. 29(7). p.931-939
Author
Organization
Abstract
We report the results of two experiments that showed that the time needed to respond to a feature of a stimulus increases when that particular feature of that particular stimulus previously had to be ignored. The data of Experiment 2 argue against the hypothesis that the observed stimulus-feature specific negative priming was due to a response conflict instigated by automatic episodic retrieval of prime responses. Experiment 2 also showed that the effects were not caused by difficulties in switching between prime and probe tasks and provided additional evidence for the fact that priming effects were stimulus-feature specific. The present results suggest that the selective inhibition or episodic encoding mechanisms that are assumed to underlie negative priming can operate in a more specific and powerful manner than has been previously assumed.
Keywords
WORDS, TASK, INHIBITION, SELECTIVE ATTENTION

Citation

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Chicago
De Houwer, Jan, K Rothermund, and D Wentura. 2001. “Stimulus-feature Specific Negative Priming.” Memory & Cognition 29 (7): 931–939.
APA
De Houwer, J., Rothermund, K., & Wentura, D. (2001). Stimulus-feature specific negative priming. MEMORY & COGNITION, 29(7), 931–939.
Vancouver
1.
De Houwer J, Rothermund K, Wentura D. Stimulus-feature specific negative priming. MEMORY & COGNITION. 2001;29(7):931–9.
MLA
De Houwer, Jan, K Rothermund, and D Wentura. “Stimulus-feature Specific Negative Priming.” MEMORY & COGNITION 29.7 (2001): 931–939. Print.
@article{146720,
  abstract     = {We report the results of two experiments that showed that the time needed to respond to a feature of a stimulus increases when that particular feature of that particular stimulus previously had to be ignored. The data of Experiment 2 argue against the hypothesis that the observed stimulus-feature specific negative priming was due to a response conflict instigated by automatic episodic retrieval of prime responses. Experiment 2 also showed that the effects were not caused by difficulties in switching between prime and probe tasks and provided additional evidence for the fact that priming effects were stimulus-feature specific. The present results suggest that the selective inhibition or episodic encoding mechanisms that are assumed to underlie negative priming can operate in a more specific and powerful manner than has been previously assumed.},
  author       = {De Houwer, Jan and Rothermund, K and Wentura, D},
  issn         = {0090-502X},
  journal      = {MEMORY & COGNITION},
  keywords     = {WORDS,TASK,INHIBITION,SELECTIVE ATTENTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {931--939},
  title        = {Stimulus-feature specific negative priming},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2001},
}

Web of Science
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