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Effect of milk sampling techniques on milk composition, bacterial contamination, viability and functions of resident cells in milk.

Frédéric Vangroenweghe UGent, Hilde Dosogne, J Mehrzad and Christian Burvenich UGent (2001) VETERINARY RESEARCH. 32(6). p.565-579
abstract
Three different milk sampling techniques were evaluated during milk sampling: a direct aseptic collection from the udder through a sterile cannula was used as the reference technique, compared with either a manual or a mechanical sampling method. In this study 30 high-yielding Holstein-Friesian dairy cows at different stages of lactation and free of udder infection were used. For each milk sample, the influence of milk sampling techniques was determined for the following parameters: somatic cell count, milk composition, bacterial contamination, viability, in vitro phagocytosis and overall killing of Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305, and cellular chemiluminescence. Because milk sampling occurred throughout lactation, the differences between early, mid- and late lactation were estimated. It was concluded that bacterial contamination was not significantly different in manual milking samples and the reference technique; bacterial contamination was, however, significantly (P<0.001) higher in machine milking samples than in the reference technique. Among the different sampling techniques, no significant effects on SCC, milk composition, viability and functions of the cells isolated from milk were observed. It was found that viability, intracellular killing and cellular chemiluminescence of milk PMN were significantly lower (P<0.05) in early lactation compared to mid- lactation. Phagocytosis was significantly (P<0.05) higher in early lactation compared to mid- and late lactation, and no significant differences were observed between mid- and late lactation. From this study, it can be concluded that despite a higher bacterial contamination obtained with the mechanical sampling method, the 3 milk sampling techniques described in this study can be used for the evaluation of milk cell functions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
milk sampling technique, dairy cow, stage of lactation, milk composition, milk neutrophil functions, FLOW CYTOMETRIC MEASUREMENT, OXIDATIVE BURST ACTIVITY, POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES, NEUTROPHIL PHAGOCYTOSIS, STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS, PERIPARTURIENT PERIOD, BOVINE BLOOD, DAIRY-COWS, MASTITIS
journal title
VETERINARY RESEARCH
Vet. Res.
volume
32
issue
6
pages
565-579 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000172683700004
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.49 (2001)
JCR rank
10/126 (2001)
JCR quartile
1 (2001)
ISSN
0928-4249
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
145756
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-145756
date created
2004-01-14 13:38:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:34
@article{145756,
  abstract     = {Three different milk sampling techniques were evaluated during milk sampling: a direct aseptic collection from the udder through a sterile cannula was used as the reference technique, compared with either a manual or a mechanical sampling method. In this study 30 high-yielding Holstein-Friesian dairy cows at different stages of lactation and free of udder infection were used. For each milk sample, the influence of milk sampling techniques was determined for the following parameters: somatic cell count, milk composition, bacterial contamination, viability, in vitro phagocytosis and overall killing of Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305, and cellular chemiluminescence. Because milk sampling occurred throughout lactation, the differences between early, mid- and late lactation were estimated. It was concluded that bacterial contamination was not significantly different in manual milking samples and the reference technique; bacterial contamination was, however, significantly (P{\textlangle}0.001) higher in machine milking samples than in the reference technique. Among the different sampling techniques, no significant effects on SCC, milk composition, viability and functions of the cells isolated from milk were observed. It was found that viability, intracellular killing and cellular chemiluminescence of milk PMN were significantly lower (P{\textlangle}0.05) in early lactation compared to mid- lactation. Phagocytosis was significantly (P{\textlangle}0.05) higher in early lactation compared to mid- and late lactation, and no significant differences were observed between mid- and late lactation. From this study, it can be concluded that despite a higher bacterial contamination obtained with the mechanical sampling method, the 3 milk sampling techniques described in this study can be used for the evaluation of milk cell functions.},
  author       = {Vangroenweghe, Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric and Dosogne, Hilde and Mehrzad, J and Burvenich, Christian},
  issn         = {0928-4249},
  journal      = {VETERINARY RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {milk sampling technique,dairy cow,stage of lactation,milk composition,milk neutrophil functions,FLOW CYTOMETRIC MEASUREMENT,OXIDATIVE BURST ACTIVITY,POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES,NEUTROPHIL PHAGOCYTOSIS,STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS,PERIPARTURIENT PERIOD,BOVINE BLOOD,DAIRY-COWS,MASTITIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {565--579},
  title        = {Effect of milk sampling techniques on milk composition, bacterial contamination, viability and functions of resident cells in milk.},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2001},
}

Chicago
Vangroenweghe, Fr, Hilde Dosogne, J Mehrzad, and Christian Burvenich. 2001. “Effect of Milk Sampling Techniques on Milk Composition, Bacterial Contamination, Viability and Functions of Resident Cells in Milk.” Veterinary Research 32 (6): 565–579.
APA
Vangroenweghe, Fr, Dosogne, H., Mehrzad, J., & Burvenich, C. (2001). Effect of milk sampling techniques on milk composition, bacterial contamination, viability and functions of resident cells in milk. VETERINARY RESEARCH, 32(6), 565–579.
Vancouver
1.
Vangroenweghe F, Dosogne H, Mehrzad J, Burvenich C. Effect of milk sampling techniques on milk composition, bacterial contamination, viability and functions of resident cells in milk. VETERINARY RESEARCH. 2001;32(6):565–79.
MLA
Vangroenweghe, Fr, Hilde Dosogne, J Mehrzad, et al. “Effect of Milk Sampling Techniques on Milk Composition, Bacterial Contamination, Viability and Functions of Resident Cells in Milk.” VETERINARY RESEARCH 32.6 (2001): 565–579. Print.