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Colonization factors of Campylobacter jejuni in the chicken gut

David Hermans UGent, Kim Van Deun UGent, An Martel UGent, Filip Van Immerseel UGent, Winy Messens, Marc Heyndrickx UGent, Freddy Haesebrouck UGent and Frank Pasmans UGent (2011) VETERINARY RESEARCH. 42.
abstract
Campylobacter contaminated broiler chicken meat is an important source of foodborne gastroenteritis and poses a serious health burden in industrialized countries. Broiler chickens are commonly regarded as a natural host for this zoonotic pathogen and infected birds carry a very high C. jejuni load in their gastrointestinal tract, especially the ceca. This eventually results in contaminated carcasses during processing. Current intervention methods fail to reduce the colonization of broiler chicks by C. jejuni due to an incomplete understanding on the interaction between C. jejuni and its avian host. Clearly, C. jejuni developed several survival and colonization mechanisms which are responsible for its highly adapted nature to the chicken host. But how these mechanisms interact with one another, leading to persistent, high-level cecal colonization remains largely obscure. A plethora of mutagenesis studies in the past few years resulted in the identification of several of the genes and proteins of C. jejuni involved in different aspects of the cellular response of this bacterium in the chicken gut. In this review, a thorough, up-to-date overview will be given of the survival mechanisms and colonization factors of C. jejuni identified to date. These factors may contribute to our understanding on how C. jejuni survival and colonization in chicks is mediated, as well as provide potential targets for effective subunit vaccine development.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
FIBRONECTIN-BINDING PROTEIN, HUMAN EPITHELIAL-CELLS, IN-VIVO COLONIZATION, OXIDATIVE STRESS, GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT, CECAL COLONIZATION, CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE, COMMENSAL COLONIZATION, TRANSPOSON MUTAGENESIS, MATERNAL ANTIBODIES
journal title
VETERINARY RESEARCH
Vet. Res.
volume
42
article_number
82
pages
14 pages
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000293962900001
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
4.06 (2011)
JCR rank
1/141 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0928-4249
DOI
10.1186/1297-9716-42-82
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1451828
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1451828
date created
2011-06-24 15:31:49
date last changed
2012-04-24 12:23:43
@article{1451828,
  abstract     = {Campylobacter contaminated broiler chicken meat is an important source of foodborne gastroenteritis and poses a serious health burden in industrialized countries. Broiler chickens are commonly regarded as a natural host for this zoonotic pathogen and infected birds carry a very high C. jejuni load in their gastrointestinal tract, especially the ceca. This eventually results in contaminated carcasses during processing. Current intervention methods fail to reduce the colonization of broiler chicks by C. jejuni due to an incomplete understanding on the interaction between C. jejuni and its avian host. Clearly, C. jejuni developed several survival and colonization mechanisms which are responsible for its highly adapted nature to the chicken host. But how these mechanisms interact with one another, leading to persistent, high-level cecal colonization remains largely obscure. A plethora of mutagenesis studies in the past few years resulted in the identification of several of the genes and proteins of C. jejuni involved in different aspects of the cellular response of this bacterium in the chicken gut. In this review, a thorough, up-to-date overview will be given of the survival mechanisms and colonization factors of C. jejuni identified to date. These factors may contribute to our understanding on how C. jejuni survival and colonization in chicks is mediated, as well as provide potential targets for effective subunit vaccine development.},
  articleno    = {82},
  author       = {Hermans, David and Van Deun, Kim and Martel, An and Van Immerseel, Filip and Messens, Winy and Heyndrickx, Marc and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Pasmans, Frank},
  issn         = {0928-4249},
  journal      = {VETERINARY RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {FIBRONECTIN-BINDING PROTEIN,HUMAN EPITHELIAL-CELLS,IN-VIVO COLONIZATION,OXIDATIVE STRESS,GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT,CECAL COLONIZATION,CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE,COMMENSAL COLONIZATION,TRANSPOSON MUTAGENESIS,MATERNAL ANTIBODIES},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14},
  title        = {Colonization factors of Campylobacter jejuni in the chicken gut},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1297-9716-42-82},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Hermans, David, Kim Van Deun, An Martel, Filip Van Immerseel, Winy Messens, Marc Heyndrickx, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Frank Pasmans. 2011. “Colonization Factors of Campylobacter Jejuni in the Chicken Gut.” Veterinary Research 42.
APA
Hermans, David, Van Deun, K., Martel, A., Van Immerseel, F., Messens, W., Heyndrickx, M., Haesebrouck, F., et al. (2011). Colonization factors of Campylobacter jejuni in the chicken gut. VETERINARY RESEARCH, 42.
Vancouver
1.
Hermans D, Van Deun K, Martel A, Van Immerseel F, Messens W, Heyndrickx M, et al. Colonization factors of Campylobacter jejuni in the chicken gut. VETERINARY RESEARCH. 2011;42.
MLA
Hermans, David, Kim Van Deun, An Martel, et al. “Colonization Factors of Campylobacter Jejuni in the Chicken Gut.” VETERINARY RESEARCH 42 (2011): n. pag. Print.