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Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), phenotypes of IBD, and intestinal permeability: a study in IBD families

S Vermeire, Marc Peeters UGent, R Vlietinck, S Joossens, E Den Hond, V Bulteel, X Bossuyt, B Geypens and P Rutgeer (2001) INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. 7(1). p.8-15
abstract
Background: Serologic markers anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies with perinuclear staining (pANCA) have been proposed to study the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Their measurement may allow better phenotyping of the disease and the detection of subclinical disease. Aims: To test the hypothesis that serological markers identify an immunologic trait related to disease susceptibility. We also wanted to test the hypothesis that ASCA is a marker related to abnormal tissue permeation by common antigens. Methods: We studied the prevalence of pANCA and ASCA in a large cohort of sporadic and familial inflammatory bowel diseases and their unaffected relatives and spouses. Kinetics of ASCA was studied and the relationship between ASCA and Cr-51-EDTA intestinal permeation was investigated. Results: ASCA was associated with sporadic Crohn's disease (CD) (63%), with Crohn's patients belonging to pure CD families (62%) and also with their unaffected family members (21%). pANCA was associated with UC (58%). The prevalence of ASCA in CD patients belonging to mixed families was strikingly low (33%), ASCA was a stable marker throughout the disease and was not related to an increased small intestinal permeability. Conclusion: ASCA is strongly associated with familial CD in Belgium, and 21% of healthy family members also display the marker. The association is much weaker in patients belonging to mixed families. ASCA is a stable marker and is not a secondary phenomenon due to increased intestinal permeability.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INFLAMMATORY BOWEL-DISEASE, serological markers, ANTINEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES, PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS, ULCERATIVE-COLITIS PATIENTS, FIRST-DEGREE RELATIVES, CROHNS-DISEASE, NEUTROPHIL AUTOANTIBODIES, GENETIC-HETEROGENEITY, DIAGNOSTIC ROLE, P-ANCA, inflammatory bowel disease
journal title
INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES
Inflamm. Bowel Dis.
volume
7
issue
1
pages
8 - 15
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000167008500002
JCR category
GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.098 (2001)
JCR rank
10/46 (2001)
JCR quartile
1 (2001)
ISSN
1078-0998
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
140849
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-140849
date created
2004-01-14 13:37:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:04
@article{140849,
  abstract     = {Background: Serologic markers anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies with perinuclear staining (pANCA) have been proposed to study the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Their measurement may allow better phenotyping of the disease and the detection of subclinical disease. Aims: To test the hypothesis that serological markers identify an immunologic trait related to disease susceptibility. We also wanted to test the hypothesis that ASCA is a marker related to abnormal tissue permeation by common antigens. Methods: We studied the prevalence of pANCA and ASCA in a large cohort of sporadic and familial inflammatory bowel diseases and their unaffected relatives and spouses. Kinetics of ASCA was studied and the relationship between ASCA and Cr-51-EDTA intestinal permeation was investigated. Results: ASCA was associated with sporadic Crohn's disease (CD) (63\%), with Crohn's patients belonging to pure CD families (62\%) and also with their unaffected family members (21\%). pANCA was associated with UC (58\%). The prevalence of ASCA in CD patients belonging to mixed families was strikingly low (33\%), ASCA was a stable marker throughout the disease and was not related to an increased small intestinal permeability. Conclusion: ASCA is strongly associated with familial CD in Belgium, and 21\% of healthy family members also display the marker. The association is much weaker in patients belonging to mixed families. ASCA is a stable marker and is not a secondary phenomenon due to increased intestinal permeability.},
  author       = {Vermeire, S and Peeters, Marc and Vlietinck, R and Joossens, S and Den Hond, E and Bulteel, V and Bossuyt, X and Geypens, B and Rutgeer, P},
  issn         = {1078-0998},
  journal      = {INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES},
  keyword      = {INFLAMMATORY BOWEL-DISEASE,serological markers,ANTINEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES,PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS,ULCERATIVE-COLITIS PATIENTS,FIRST-DEGREE RELATIVES,CROHNS-DISEASE,NEUTROPHIL AUTOANTIBODIES,GENETIC-HETEROGENEITY,DIAGNOSTIC ROLE,P-ANCA,inflammatory bowel disease},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {8--15},
  title        = {Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), phenotypes of IBD, and intestinal permeability: a study in IBD families},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2001},
}

Chicago
Vermeire, S, Marc Peeters, R Vlietinck, S Joossens, E Den Hond, V Bulteel, X Bossuyt, B Geypens, and P Rutgeer. 2001. “Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibodies (ASCA), Phenotypes of IBD, and Intestinal Permeability: a Study in IBD Families.” Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 7 (1): 8–15.
APA
Vermeire, S, Peeters, M., Vlietinck, R., Joossens, S., Den Hond, E., Bulteel, V., Bossuyt, X., et al. (2001). Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), phenotypes of IBD, and intestinal permeability: a study in IBD families. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES, 7(1), 8–15.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeire S, Peeters M, Vlietinck R, Joossens S, Den Hond E, Bulteel V, et al. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), phenotypes of IBD, and intestinal permeability: a study in IBD families. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. 2001;7(1):8–15.
MLA
Vermeire, S, Marc Peeters, R Vlietinck, et al. “Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibodies (ASCA), Phenotypes of IBD, and Intestinal Permeability: a Study in IBD Families.” INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES 7.1 (2001): 8–15. Print.