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GPS surveying techniques in archaeology: topographical survey of the Thorikos region (Greece)

(2000) Babesch Supplementa. 5. p.189-196
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Organization
Abstract
Not only for pure topographical but also for archaeological purposes, GPS is a suitable surveying technique that permits to measure detail points with a high accuracy comparable to that obtained with a totalstation, but with a higher efficiency as there is no visibility required between the reference antenna and the measuring or "roving" antenna. We shall describe below the basic principles of GPS, the different possible measuring modes, and finally a detailed example of how some of these measuring modes were used for the topographical survey executed with GPS equipment in Thorikos (Greece) in 1997. In a separate article [1], a critical comparison of GPS sun,eying and surveying with totalstation in the specific archaeological measuring conditions of Greece is made and the gain in efficiency will be quantified as exactly as possible.

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Chicago
De Wulf, Alain, Tom Van Herck, Morgan De Dapper, and Beata De Vliegher. 2000. “GPS Surveying Techniques in Archaeology: Topographical Survey of the Thorikos Region (Greece).” In Babesch Supplementa, ed. Frank Vermeulen and Morgan De Dapper, 5:189–196. Leuven, Belgium: Peeters.
APA
De Wulf, A., Van Herck, T., De Dapper, M., & De Vliegher, B. (2000). GPS surveying techniques in archaeology: topographical survey of the Thorikos region (Greece). In Frank Vermeulen & M. De Dapper (Eds.), Babesch Supplementa (Vol. 5, pp. 189–196). Presented at the International colloquium on Geoarchaeology of the Landscapes of Classical Antiquity, Leuven, Belgium: Peeters.
Vancouver
1.
De Wulf A, Van Herck T, De Dapper M, De Vliegher B. GPS surveying techniques in archaeology: topographical survey of the Thorikos region (Greece). In: Vermeulen F, De Dapper M, editors. Babesch Supplementa. Leuven, Belgium: Peeters; 2000. p. 189–96.
MLA
De Wulf, Alain, Tom Van Herck, Morgan De Dapper, et al. “GPS Surveying Techniques in Archaeology: Topographical Survey of the Thorikos Region (Greece).” Babesch Supplementa. Ed. Frank Vermeulen & Morgan De Dapper. Vol. 5. Leuven, Belgium: Peeters, 2000. 189–196. Print.
@inproceedings{139614,
  abstract     = {Not only for pure topographical but also for archaeological purposes, GPS is a suitable surveying technique that permits to measure detail points with a high accuracy comparable to that obtained with a totalstation, but with a higher efficiency as there is no visibility required between the reference antenna and the measuring or {\textacutedbl}roving{\textacutedbl} antenna. We shall describe below the basic principles of GPS, the different possible measuring modes, and finally a detailed example of how some of these measuring modes were used for the topographical survey executed with GPS equipment in Thorikos (Greece) in 1997. In a separate article [1], a critical comparison of GPS sun,eying and surveying with totalstation in the specific archaeological measuring conditions of Greece is made and the gain in efficiency will be quantified as exactly as possible.},
  author       = {De Wulf, Alain and Van Herck, Tom and De Dapper, Morgan and De Vliegher, Beata},
  booktitle    = {Babesch Supplementa},
  editor       = {Vermeulen, Frank and De Dapper, Morgan},
  isbn         = {9789042909281},
  issn         = {0926-9312},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {189--196},
  publisher    = {Peeters},
  title        = {GPS surveying techniques in archaeology: topographical survey of the Thorikos region (Greece)},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2000},
}

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