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'Une fleur que ses yeux éteints ne peuvent plus contempler': women's sculpture for the dead

Marjan Sterckx UGent (2013) Women and the material culture of death. p.169-190
abstract
From the moment that women sculptors emerged, they have been creating sculptures for the dead, in multiple forms. Many of them specialized in the art of portraying, which was in high demand for wax figures, statues and funeral monuments. The fact that those, along with war memorials, often played on the area of emotions –which was traditionally viewed as ‘female’– apparently made the choice for a woman sculptor even more acceptable. The commissions for funeral monuments and war memorials more often came through unofficial rather than official channels, creating better opportunities for female artists.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
bookChapter
publication status
published
subject
keyword
wax effigies, cemeteries, women sculptors, funerary sculpture, taxidermy, war memorial, death, women, pleurant, portraiture
book title
Women and the material culture of death
editor
Beth F Tobin and Maureen D Goggin
pages
169 - 190
publisher
Ashgate
place of publication
Surrey, UK & Burlington, USA
ISBN
9781409444169
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
B2
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1340003
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1340003
alternative location
http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409444169
date created
2011-06-24 14:08:25
date last changed
2013-11-08 15:25:46
@incollection{1340003,
  abstract     = {From the moment that women sculptors emerged, they have been creating sculptures for the dead, in multiple forms. Many of them specialized in the art of portraying, which was in high demand for wax figures, statues and funeral monuments. The fact that those, along with war memorials, often played on the area of emotions --which was traditionally viewed as {\textquoteleft}female{\textquoteright}-- apparently made the choice for a woman sculptor even more acceptable. The commissions for funeral monuments and war memorials more often came through unofficial rather than official channels, creating better opportunities for female artists.},
  author       = {Sterckx, Marjan},
  booktitle    = {Women and the material culture of death},
  editor       = {Tobin , Beth F and Goggin, Maureen D},
  isbn         = {9781409444169},
  keyword      = {wax effigies,cemeteries,women sculptors,funerary sculpture,taxidermy,war memorial,death,women,pleurant,portraiture},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {169--190},
  publisher    = {Ashgate},
  title        = {'Une fleur que ses yeux {\'e}teints ne peuvent plus contempler': women's sculpture for the dead},
  url          = {http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409444169},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Sterckx, Marjan. 2013. “‘Une Fleur Que Ses Yeux Éteints Ne Peuvent Plus Contempler’: Women’s Sculpture for the Dead.” In Women and the Material Culture of Death, ed. Beth F Tobin and Maureen D Goggin, 169–190. Surrey, UK & Burlington, USA: Ashgate.
APA
Sterckx, M. (2013). “Une fleur que ses yeux éteints ne peuvent plus contempler”: women’s sculpture for the dead. In B. F. Tobin & M. D. Goggin (Eds.), Women and the material culture of death (pp. 169–190). Surrey, UK & Burlington, USA: Ashgate.
Vancouver
1.
Sterckx M. “Une fleur que ses yeux éteints ne peuvent plus contempler”: women’s sculpture for the dead. In: Tobin BF, Goggin MD, editors. Women and the material culture of death. Surrey, UK & Burlington, USA: Ashgate; 2013. p. 169–90.
MLA
Sterckx, Marjan. “‘Une Fleur Que Ses Yeux Éteints Ne Peuvent Plus Contempler’: Women’s Sculpture for the Dead.” Women and the Material Culture of Death. Ed. Beth F Tobin & Maureen D Goggin. Surrey, UK & Burlington, USA: Ashgate, 2013. 169–190. Print.