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Baseline HIV type 1 genotypic resistance to a newly added nucleoside analog is predictive of virologic failure of the new therapy.

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Abstract
We evaluated the predictive value of baseline HTV-1 genotypic resistance mutations for failure of a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) containing therapy. The change in therapy of 88 HIV-1-infected patients was analyzed retrospectively, relating the genotypic resistance profile at baseline to the evolution of viral load and CD4+ T cell counts. Genotypic resistance at baseline and at 6 months was evaluated with the LiPA HIV-1 RT, which detects mutations at codons 41, 69, 70, 74, 184, and 215, At 1 to 3 months after change in therapy, patients without preexisting resistance mutations to the new drug (group S) had a significantly better evolution in viral load (reduction of 0.37 log(10)) compared with patients with known preexisting resistance mutation(s) (group R) (increase of 0.08 log(10)), This difference was particularly striking for patients with the baseline M184V mutation and whose treatment was modified by the addition of lamivudine. After 6 months the median difference in viral load evolution between the two groups increased to 0.61 log(10): the viral load of patients of group S was still 0.18 log(10) below baseline while patients of group R had an increase of 0.43 log(10) in viral load above baseline. Changes in CD4+ T cell counts were not significantly different. The evolution in viral load in HIV-1-infected patients with and without baseline resistance mutation(s) toward a newly added NRTI is significantly different at 1-3 months and at 6 months after changing or adding one NRTI.

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Chicago
VAN VAERENBERGH, K, K VAN LAETHEM, E VAN WIJNGAERDEN, JC SCHMIT, F SCHNEIDER, L RUIZ, B CLOTET, et al. 2000. “Baseline HIV Type 1 Genotypic Resistance to a Newly Added Nucleoside Analog Is Predictive of Virologic Failure of the New Therapy.” Aids Research and Human Retroviruses 16 (6): 529–537.
APA
VAN VAERENBERGH, K., VAN LAETHEM, K., VAN WIJNGAERDEN, E., SCHMIT, J., SCHNEIDER, F., RUIZ, L., CLOTET, B., et al. (2000). Baseline HIV type 1 genotypic resistance to a newly added nucleoside analog is predictive of virologic failure of the new therapy. AIDS RESEARCH AND HUMAN RETROVIRUSES, 16(6), 529–537.
Vancouver
1.
VAN VAERENBERGH K, VAN LAETHEM K, VAN WIJNGAERDEN E, SCHMIT J, SCHNEIDER F, RUIZ L, et al. Baseline HIV type 1 genotypic resistance to a newly added nucleoside analog is predictive of virologic failure of the new therapy. AIDS RESEARCH AND HUMAN RETROVIRUSES. 2000;16(6):529–37.
MLA
VAN VAERENBERGH, K, K VAN LAETHEM, E VAN WIJNGAERDEN, et al. “Baseline HIV Type 1 Genotypic Resistance to a Newly Added Nucleoside Analog Is Predictive of Virologic Failure of the New Therapy.” AIDS RESEARCH AND HUMAN RETROVIRUSES 16.6 (2000): 529–537. Print.
@article{127587,
  abstract     = {We evaluated the predictive value of baseline HTV-1 genotypic resistance mutations for failure of a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) containing therapy. The change in therapy of 88 HIV-1-infected patients was analyzed retrospectively, relating the genotypic resistance profile at baseline to the evolution of viral load and CD4+ T cell counts. Genotypic resistance at baseline and at 6 months was evaluated with the LiPA HIV-1 RT, which detects mutations at codons 41, 69, 70, 74, 184, and 215, At 1 to 3 months after change in therapy, patients without preexisting resistance mutations to the new drug (group S) had a significantly better evolution in viral load (reduction of 0.37 log(10)) compared with patients with known preexisting resistance mutation(s) (group R) (increase of 0.08 log(10)), This difference was particularly striking for patients with the baseline M184V mutation and whose treatment was modified by the addition of lamivudine. After 6 months the median difference in viral load evolution between the two groups increased to 0.61 log(10): the viral load of patients of group S was still 0.18 log(10) below baseline while patients of group R had an increase of 0.43 log(10) in viral load above baseline. Changes in CD4+ T cell counts were not significantly different. The evolution in viral load in HIV-1-infected patients with and without baseline resistance mutation(s) toward a newly added NRTI is significantly different at 1-3 months and at 6 months after changing or adding one NRTI.},
  author       = {VAN VAERENBERGH, K and VAN LAETHEM, K and VAN WIJNGAERDEN, E and SCHMIT, JC and SCHNEIDER, F and RUIZ, L and CLOTET, B and Verhofstede, Chris and Van Wanzeele, Filip and MUYLDERMANS, G. and SIMONS, P and STUYVER, L. and HERMANS, P and EVANS, C and DE CLERCQ, E and DESMYTER, J and VANDAMME, AM},
  issn         = {0889-2229},
  journal      = {AIDS RESEARCH AND HUMAN RETROVIRUSES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {529--537},
  title        = {Baseline HIV type 1 genotypic resistance to a newly added nucleoside analog is predictive of virologic failure of the new therapy.},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2000},
}

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