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The use of hypnosedative drugs in a university hospital: has anything changed in 10 years?

Annemie Somers UGent, Hugo Robays UGent, Kurt Audenaert UGent, GEORGES VAN MAELE UGent, Marcus Bogaert UGent and Mirko Petrovic UGent (2011) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY. 67(7). p.723-729
abstract
Aim Our goal was to investigate the use of hypnosedatives (HSs) before and during hospitalization, explore the relationship between their use and various demographic and clinical variables, and compare the results with data from a similar 2000 study with particular interest in adherence to hospital formulary guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional observational survey of 326 hospitalized patients recruited from ten wards of the Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium, with a patient interview and by evaluating medical and nursing files. Results In 30.7% of patients, the use of a HS before admission was reported. According to the patient interview, 33.1% used a HS during hospitalization. However, according to medical and nursing files, use of HSs in the hospital was 10% higher (43.3%). In 19.4% of patients who took HSs before admission, their use was discontinued in the hospital. In 15.6% of patients who took no HS before admission, a HS was started in the hospital, according to the formulary guidelines (data from files). There was a positive correlation between HS use in the hospital and older age, longer hospitalization, not coming from home, higher number of HSs taken before hospitalization, sleeping problems emerging during hospitalization, and central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In comparison with 2000, we registered a slight decrease in HS use during hospitalization and a decrease in the number of newly started patients. Conclusions The prevalence of HS use in our university hospital is high, mostly as a result of continuation of HSs started before admission, as there seems to be no general policy of active cessation. Compared with the survey performed 10 years ago, fewer hospitalized patients are newly started on HSs, and when this is the case, the formulary guidelines are followed.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Prescribing patterns, MANAGEMENT, Keywords Hypnosedatives (HSs), BENEFITS, Formulary guidelines, Risk factors, BENZODIAZEPINES, PRESCRIPTION, INPATIENTS, INSOMNIA, HYPNOTICS, METAANALYSIS, ANXIOLYTICS, IMPACT
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
Eur. J. Clin. Pharmacol.
volume
67
issue
7
pages
723 - 729
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000291602700010
JCR category
PHARMACOLOGY & PHARMACY
JCR impact factor
2.845 (2011)
JCR rank
91/259 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0031-6970
DOI
10.1007/s00228-010-0983-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1267859
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1267859
date created
2011-06-18 16:25:12
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:37:31
@article{1267859,
  abstract     = {Aim Our goal was to investigate the use of hypnosedatives (HSs) before and during hospitalization, explore the relationship between their use and various demographic and clinical variables, and compare the results with data from a similar 2000 study with particular interest in adherence to hospital formulary guidelines.
Methods A cross-sectional observational survey of 326 hospitalized patients recruited from ten wards of the Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium, with a patient interview and by evaluating medical and nursing files.
Results In 30.7\% of patients, the use of a HS before admission was reported. According to the patient interview, 33.1\% used a HS during hospitalization. However, according to medical and nursing files, use of HSs in the hospital was 10\% higher (43.3\%). In 19.4\% of patients who took HSs before admission, their use was discontinued in the hospital. In 15.6\% of patients who took no HS before admission, a HS was started in the hospital, according to the formulary guidelines (data from files). There was a positive correlation between HS use in the hospital and older age, longer hospitalization, not coming from home, higher number of HSs taken before hospitalization, sleeping problems emerging during hospitalization, and central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In comparison with 2000, we registered a slight decrease in HS use during hospitalization and a decrease in the number of newly started patients.
Conclusions The prevalence of HS use in our university hospital is high, mostly as a result of continuation of HSs started before admission, as there seems to be no general policy of active cessation. Compared with the survey performed 10 years ago, fewer hospitalized patients are newly started on HSs, and when this is the case, the formulary guidelines are followed.},
  author       = {Somers, Annemie and Robays, Hugo and Audenaert, Kurt and VAN MAELE, GEORGES and Bogaert, Marcus and Petrovic, Mirko},
  issn         = {0031-6970},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Prescribing patterns,MANAGEMENT,Keywords Hypnosedatives (HSs),BENEFITS,Formulary guidelines,Risk factors,BENZODIAZEPINES,PRESCRIPTION,INPATIENTS,INSOMNIA,HYPNOTICS,METAANALYSIS,ANXIOLYTICS,IMPACT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {723--729},
  title        = {The use of hypnosedative drugs in a university hospital: has anything changed in 10 years?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00228-010-0983-2},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Somers, Annemie, Hugo Robays, Kurt Audenaert, Georges Van Maele, Marcus Bogaert, and Mirko Petrovic. 2011. “The Use of Hypnosedative Drugs in a University Hospital: Has Anything Changed in 10 Years?” European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 67 (7): 723–729.
APA
Somers, Annemie, Robays, H., Audenaert, K., Van Maele, G., Bogaert, M., & Petrovic, M. (2011). The use of hypnosedative drugs in a university hospital: has anything changed in 10 years? EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 67(7), 723–729.
Vancouver
1.
Somers A, Robays H, Audenaert K, Van Maele G, Bogaert M, Petrovic M. The use of hypnosedative drugs in a university hospital: has anything changed in 10 years? EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY. 2011;67(7):723–9.
MLA
Somers, Annemie, Hugo Robays, Kurt Audenaert, et al. “The Use of Hypnosedative Drugs in a University Hospital: Has Anything Changed in 10 Years?” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY 67.7 (2011): 723–729. Print.