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What's a brain: neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of anxiety disorders in dogs

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The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
Abstract
This review deals with the neurocircuitry of fear and anxiety disorders, with the focus on neuroanatomy and neurochemistry. This knowledge is required to correctly diagnose and treat dogs with anxiety-related behavioral disorders. Research to date has shown the involvement of the frontal cortex, the amygdala, the thalamus and the hippocampus as core regions in regulating fear. Imbalances (hyper- or hypoactivation) in this fear circuitry can trigger inappropriate fear responses, i.e. anxiety disorders. Serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine are the main neurotransmitters of emotion in the brain, but gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis producing glucocorticoids are also important in the neurochemistry of anxiety.
Keywords
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER, SEROTONIN REUPTAKE TRANSPORTER, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, 5-HT2A RECEPTOR-BINDING, PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS, ELEVATED PLUS-MAZE, PANIC DISORDER, SOCIAL PHOBIA, DECREASED EXPRESSION, DOPAMINE INTERACTION

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vermeire, Simon, Kurt Audenaert, Eva Vandermeulen, Rudy De Meester, Henri van Bree, André Dobbeleir, and Kathelijne Peremans. 2011. “What’s a Brain: Neuroanatomy and Neurochemistry of Anxiety Disorders in Dogs.” Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift 80 (3): 175–184.
APA
Vermeire, Simon, Audenaert, K., Vandermeulen, E., De Meester, R., van Bree, H., Dobbeleir, A., & Peremans, K. (2011). What’s a brain: neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of anxiety disorders in dogs. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT, 80(3), 175–184.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeire S, Audenaert K, Vandermeulen E, De Meester R, van Bree H, Dobbeleir A, et al. What’s a brain: neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of anxiety disorders in dogs. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT. 2011;80(3):175–84.
MLA
Vermeire, Simon, Kurt Audenaert, Eva Vandermeulen, et al. “What’s a Brain: Neuroanatomy and Neurochemistry of Anxiety Disorders in Dogs.” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT 80.3 (2011): 175–184. Print.
@article{1266681,
  abstract     = {This review deals with the neurocircuitry of fear and anxiety disorders, with the focus on neuroanatomy and neurochemistry. This knowledge is required to correctly diagnose and treat dogs with anxiety-related behavioral disorders. 
Research to date has shown the involvement of the frontal cortex, the amygdala, the thalamus and the hippocampus as core regions in regulating fear. Imbalances (hyper- or hypoactivation) in this fear circuitry can trigger inappropriate fear responses, i.e. anxiety disorders. 
Serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine are the main neurotransmitters of emotion in the brain, but gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis producing glucocorticoids are also important in the neurochemistry of anxiety.},
  author       = {Vermeire, Simon and Audenaert, Kurt and Vandermeulen, Eva and De Meester, Rudy and van Bree, Henri and Dobbeleir, Andr{\'e} and Peremans, Kathelijne},
  issn         = {0303-9021},
  journal      = {VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT},
  keyword      = {OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER,SEROTONIN REUPTAKE TRANSPORTER,POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER,5-HT2A RECEPTOR-BINDING,PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS,ELEVATED PLUS-MAZE,PANIC DISORDER,SOCIAL PHOBIA,DECREASED EXPRESSION,DOPAMINE INTERACTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {175--184},
  title        = {What's a brain: neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of anxiety disorders in dogs},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2011},
}

Web of Science
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