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Quality of life after intensive care: a systematic review of the literature

Sandra Oeyen UGent, Dominique Vandijck UGent, Dominique Benoit UGent, Lieven Annemans UGent and Johan Decruyenaere UGent (2010) CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE. 38(12). p.2386-2400
abstract
Objectives: To evaluate quality of life at least 12 months after discharge from the intensive care unit of adult critically ill patients, to evaluate the methodology used to assess long-term quality of life, and to give an overview of factors influencing quality of life. Data Sources: EMBASE-PubMed, MEDLINE (OVID), SCI/Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and personal files. Data Extraction: Data extraction was performed independently and cross-checked by two reviewers using a predefined data extraction form. Eligible studies were published between 1999 and 2009 and assessed quality of life >= 12 months after intensive care unit discharge by means of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, the RAND 36-Item Health Survey, EuroQol-5D, and/or the Nottingham Health Profile in adult intensive care unit patients. Data Synthesis: Fifty-three articles (10 multicenters) were included, with the majority of studies performed in Europe (68%). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was used in 55%, and the EuroQol-5D, the Nottingham Health Profile, the RAND 36-Item Health Survey, or a combination was used in 21%, 9%, 8%, or 8%, respectively. A response rate of >= 80% was attained in 26 studies (49%). Critically ill patients had a lower quality of life than an age-and gender-matched population, but quality of life tended to improve over years. The worst reductions in quality of life were seen in cases of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, prolonged mechanical ventilation, severe trauma, and severe sepsis. Study quality criteria, defined as a baseline quality of life assessment, the absence of major exclusion criteria, a description of nonresponders, and a comparison with a reference population were met in only four studies (8%). Results concerning the influence of severity of illness, comorbidity, preadmission quality of life, age, gender, or acquired complications were conflicting. Conclusions: Quality of life differed on diagnostic category but, overall, critically ill patients had a lower quality of life than an age-and gender-matched population. A minority of studies met the predefined methodologic quality criteria. Results concerning the influence of the patients' characteristics and illnesses on long-term quality of life were conflicting.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
quality of life, long-term outcome, ELDERLY-PATIENTS, CRITICALLY-ILL PATIENTS, PROLONGED MECHANICAL VENTILATION, intensive care unit, HOSPITAL CARDIAC-ARREST, RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS-SYNDROME, ACUTE-PANCREATITIS, PULMONARY-FUNCTION, MAJOR TRAUMA, NOTTINGHAM HEALTH PROFILE, comorbidity, methodology, LONG-TERM SURVIVORS, critically ill patients
journal title
CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE
Crit. Care Med.
volume
38
issue
12
pages
2386 - 2400
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000284462000017
JCR category
CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE
JCR impact factor
6.254 (2010)
JCR rank
2/23 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0090-3493
DOI
10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181f3dec5
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1260189
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1260189
date created
2011-06-10 15:30:24
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:47
@article{1260189,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To evaluate quality of life at least 12 months after discharge from the intensive care unit of adult critically ill patients, to evaluate the methodology used to assess long-term quality of life, and to give an overview of factors influencing quality of life.
Data Sources: EMBASE-PubMed, MEDLINE (OVID), SCI/Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and personal files.
Data Extraction: Data extraction was performed independently and cross-checked by two reviewers using a predefined data extraction form. Eligible studies were published between 1999 and 2009 and assessed quality of life {\textrangle}= 12 months after intensive care unit discharge by means of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, the RAND 36-Item Health Survey, EuroQol-5D, and/or the Nottingham Health Profile in adult intensive care unit patients.
Data Synthesis: Fifty-three articles (10 multicenters) were included, with the majority of studies performed in Europe (68\%). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was used in 55\%, and the EuroQol-5D, the Nottingham Health Profile, the RAND 36-Item Health Survey, or a combination was used in 21\%, 9\%, 8\%, or 8\%, respectively. A response rate of {\textrangle}= 80\% was attained in 26 studies (49\%). Critically ill patients had a lower quality of life than an age-and gender-matched population, but quality of life tended to improve over years. The worst reductions in quality of life were seen in cases of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, prolonged mechanical ventilation, severe trauma, and severe sepsis. Study quality criteria, defined as a baseline quality of life assessment, the absence of major exclusion criteria, a description of nonresponders, and a comparison with a reference population were met in only four studies (8\%). Results concerning the influence of severity of illness, comorbidity, preadmission quality of life, age, gender, or acquired complications were conflicting.
Conclusions: Quality of life differed on diagnostic category but, overall, critically ill patients had a lower quality of life than an age-and gender-matched population. A minority of studies met the predefined methodologic quality criteria. Results concerning the influence of the patients' characteristics and illnesses on long-term quality of life were conflicting.},
  author       = {Oeyen, Sandra and Vandijck, Dominique and Benoit, Dominique and Annemans, Lieven and Decruyenaere, Johan},
  issn         = {0090-3493},
  journal      = {CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {quality of life,long-term outcome,ELDERLY-PATIENTS,CRITICALLY-ILL PATIENTS,PROLONGED MECHANICAL VENTILATION,intensive care unit,HOSPITAL CARDIAC-ARREST,RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS-SYNDROME,ACUTE-PANCREATITIS,PULMONARY-FUNCTION,MAJOR TRAUMA,NOTTINGHAM HEALTH PROFILE,comorbidity,methodology,LONG-TERM SURVIVORS,critically ill patients},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2386--2400},
  title        = {Quality of life after intensive care: a systematic review of the literature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181f3dec5},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Oeyen, Sandra, Dominique Vandijck, Dominique Benoit, Lieven Annemans, and Johan Decruyenaere. 2010. “Quality of Life After Intensive Care: a Systematic Review of the Literature.” Critical Care Medicine 38 (12): 2386–2400.
APA
Oeyen, S., Vandijck, D., Benoit, D., Annemans, L., & Decruyenaere, J. (2010). Quality of life after intensive care: a systematic review of the literature. CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 38(12), 2386–2400.
Vancouver
1.
Oeyen S, Vandijck D, Benoit D, Annemans L, Decruyenaere J. Quality of life after intensive care: a systematic review of the literature. CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE. 2010;38(12):2386–400.
MLA
Oeyen, Sandra, Dominique Vandijck, Dominique Benoit, et al. “Quality of Life After Intensive Care: a Systematic Review of the Literature.” CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE 38.12 (2010): 2386–2400. Print.