Advanced search
1 file | 86.88 KB

Sedentary behaviours and socio-economic status in Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background: This study aimed to describe the influence of socio-economic status (SES) on the prevalence sedentary behaviours among Spanish adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional data from Spanish adolescents from the Alimentacion y Valoracion del Estado Nutricional de los Adolescentes (AVENA) Study (2002). A national representative sample of 1776 adolescents aged 13-18.5 years provided information about time spent watching television (TV), playing with computer or videogames and studying. Parental education and occupation were assessed as SES. Participants were categorized by gender, age, parental education and occupation. Logistic regression models were used. Results: No gender differences were found for TV viewing. For computer and videogames use (weekdays), more boys played > 3 h/day (P < 0.001), whereas a higher percentage of girls reported studying > 3 h/day (P < 0.001). Among boys, parental education and occupation were inversely associated with TV viewing, parental occupation directly associated with study and maternal education inversely with computer and videogames use during weekdays (all P < 0.05). For girls, parental occupation was inversely associated with TV viewing. Conclusion: Spanish adolescents presented different sedentary patterns according to age, gender and SES. Boys reported more time engaged in electronic games, whereas girls reported more time studying. Parental occupation had more influence than parental education on the time spent in sedentary behaviours.
Keywords
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, TELEVISION-VIEWING HABITS, BIRTH COHORT, OVERWEIGHT RISK, socio-economic status, OBESITY, CHILDREN, INACTIVITY, CHILDHOOD, HEALTH, YOUTH, adolescence, media, inactivity

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 86.88 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Rey-Lopez, Juan P, Concepcion Tomas, German Vicente-Rodriguez, Luis Gracia-Marco, David Jimenez-Pavon, Francisca Perez-Llamas, Carlos Redondo, et al. 2011. “Sedentary Behaviours and Socio-economic Status in Spanish Adolescents: The AVENA Study.” European Journal of Public Health 21 (2): 151–157.
APA
Rey-Lopez, J. P., Tomas, C., Vicente-Rodriguez, G., Gracia-Marco, L., Jimenez-Pavon, D., Perez-Llamas, F., Redondo, C., et al. (2011). Sedentary behaviours and socio-economic status in Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 21(2), 151–157.
Vancouver
1.
Rey-Lopez JP, Tomas C, Vicente-Rodriguez G, Gracia-Marco L, Jimenez-Pavon D, Perez-Llamas F, et al. Sedentary behaviours and socio-economic status in Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 2011;21(2):151–7.
MLA
Rey-Lopez, Juan P, Concepcion Tomas, German Vicente-Rodriguez, et al. “Sedentary Behaviours and Socio-economic Status in Spanish Adolescents: The AVENA Study.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH 21.2 (2011): 151–157. Print.
@article{1259649,
  abstract     = {Background: This study aimed to describe the influence of socio-economic status (SES) on the prevalence sedentary behaviours among Spanish adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional data from Spanish adolescents from the Alimentacion y Valoracion del Estado Nutricional de los Adolescentes (AVENA) Study (2002). A national representative sample of 1776 adolescents aged 13-18.5 years provided information about time spent watching television (TV), playing with computer or videogames and studying. Parental education and occupation were assessed as SES. Participants were categorized by gender, age, parental education and occupation. Logistic regression models were used. Results: No gender differences were found for TV viewing. For computer and videogames use (weekdays), more boys played {\textrangle} 3 h/day (P {\textlangle} 0.001), whereas a higher percentage of girls reported studying {\textrangle} 3 h/day (P {\textlangle} 0.001). Among boys, parental education and occupation were inversely associated with TV viewing, parental occupation directly associated with study and maternal education inversely with computer and videogames use during weekdays (all P {\textlangle} 0.05). For girls, parental occupation was inversely associated with TV viewing. Conclusion: Spanish adolescents presented different sedentary patterns according to age, gender and SES. Boys reported more time engaged in electronic games, whereas girls reported more time studying. Parental occupation had more influence than parental education on the time spent in sedentary behaviours.},
  author       = {Rey-Lopez, Juan P and Tomas, Concepcion and Vicente-Rodriguez, German and Gracia-Marco, Luis and Jimenez-Pavon, David and Perez-Llamas, Francisca and Redondo, Carlos and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Sjostrom, Michael and Marcos, Ascension and Chillon, Palma and Moreno, Luis A},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH},
  keyword      = {PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY,TELEVISION-VIEWING HABITS,BIRTH COHORT,OVERWEIGHT RISK,socio-economic status,OBESITY,CHILDREN,INACTIVITY,CHILDHOOD,HEALTH,YOUTH,adolescence,media,inactivity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {151--157},
  title        = {Sedentary behaviours and socio-economic status in Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckq035},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2011},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: