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Tree girdling responses simulated by a water and carbon transport model

Veerle De Schepper UGent and Kathy Steppe UGent (2011) ANNALS OF BOTANY. 108(6). p.1147-1154
abstract
Background and Aims : Girdling, or the removal of a strip of bark around a tree's outer circumference, is often used to study carbon relationships, as it triggers several carbon responses which seem to be interrelated. Methods : An existing plant model describing water and carbon transport in a tree was used to evaluate the mechanisms behind the girdling responses. Therefore, the (un) loading functions of the original model were adapted and became a function of the phloem turgor pressure. Key Results : The adapted model successfully simulated the measured changes in stem growth induced by girdling. The model indicated that the key driving variables for the girdling responses were changes in turgor pressure due to local changes in sugar concentrations. Information about the local damage to the phloem system was transferred to the other plant parts (crown and roots) by a change in phloem pressure. After girdling, the loading rate was affected and corresponded to the experimentally observed feedback inhibition. In addition, the unloading rate decreased after girdling and even reversed in some instances. The model enabled continuous simulation of changes in starch content, although a slight underestimation was observed compared with measured values. Conclusions : For the first time a mechanistic plant model enabled simulation of tree girdling responses, which have thus far only been experimentally observed and fragmentally reported in literature. The close agreement between measured and simulated data confirms the underlying mechanisms introduced in the model.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
girdling, Feedback inhibition, loading, mechanistic plant modelling, phloem turgor, photosynthesis, Quercus robur L., stem diameter variations, transport model, unloading, STEM DIAMETER VARIATIONS, SOIL RESPIRATION, PINE TREES, PHLOEM, XYLEM, FLOW, LEAVES, PHOTOSYNTHESIS, CITRUS, GROWTH
journal title
ANNALS OF BOTANY
Ann. Bot.
volume
108
issue
6
issue title
Functional-structural plant modelling
pages
1147 - 1154
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000295885900015
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
4.03 (2011)
JCR rank
19/189 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0305-7364
DOI
10.1093/aob/mcr068
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1258745
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1258745
date created
2011-06-09 13:48:01
date last changed
2012-05-02 13:45:58
@article{1258745,
  abstract     = {Background and Aims : Girdling, or the removal of a strip of bark around a tree's outer circumference, is often used to study carbon relationships, as it triggers several carbon responses which seem to be interrelated. 
Methods : An existing plant model describing water and carbon transport in a tree was used to evaluate the mechanisms behind the girdling responses. Therefore, the (un) loading functions of the original model were adapted and became a function of the phloem turgor pressure. 
Key Results : The adapted model successfully simulated the measured changes in stem growth induced by girdling. The model indicated that the key driving variables for the girdling responses were changes in turgor pressure due to local changes in sugar concentrations. Information about the local damage to the phloem system was transferred to the other plant parts (crown and roots) by a change in phloem pressure. After girdling, the loading rate was affected and corresponded to the experimentally observed feedback inhibition. In addition, the unloading rate decreased after girdling and even reversed in some instances. The model enabled continuous simulation of changes in starch content, although a slight underestimation was observed compared with measured values. 
Conclusions : For the first time a mechanistic plant model enabled simulation of tree girdling responses, which have thus far only been experimentally observed and fragmentally reported in literature. The close agreement between measured and simulated data confirms the underlying mechanisms introduced in the model.},
  author       = {De Schepper, Veerle and Steppe, Kathy},
  issn         = {0305-7364},
  journal      = {ANNALS OF BOTANY},
  keyword      = {girdling,Feedback inhibition,loading,mechanistic plant modelling,phloem turgor,photosynthesis,Quercus robur L.,stem diameter variations,transport model,unloading,STEM DIAMETER VARIATIONS,SOIL RESPIRATION,PINE TREES,PHLOEM,XYLEM,FLOW,LEAVES,PHOTOSYNTHESIS,CITRUS,GROWTH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1147--1154},
  title        = {Tree girdling responses simulated by a water and carbon transport model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcr068},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
De Schepper, Veerle, and Kathy Steppe. 2011. “Tree Girdling Responses Simulated by a Water and Carbon Transport Model.” Annals of Botany 108 (6): 1147–1154.
APA
De Schepper, V., & Steppe, K. (2011). Tree girdling responses simulated by a water and carbon transport model. ANNALS OF BOTANY, 108(6), 1147–1154.
Vancouver
1.
De Schepper V, Steppe K. Tree girdling responses simulated by a water and carbon transport model. ANNALS OF BOTANY. 2011;108(6):1147–54.
MLA
De Schepper, Veerle, and Kathy Steppe. “Tree Girdling Responses Simulated by a Water and Carbon Transport Model.” ANNALS OF BOTANY 108.6 (2011): 1147–1154. Print.