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Nasal swelling due to plasma cell infiltrate in a cat without plasma cell pododermatitis

Jan Declercq and Hendrik De Bosschere (2010) VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY. 21(4). p.412-414
abstract
A cat with an upper respiratory infection was presented for examination. Close examination of the face revealed a firm, haired rounded swelling on the bridge of the nose. Serum protein electrophoresis demonstrated a mild hypergammaglobulinaemia. The cat tested negative for feline immunodeficiency virus. Skin biopsy of the nasal lesion revealed nodular angiocentric infiltrates in the deep dermis and subcutis. The mixed infiltrate had numerous plasma cells. Presence of calicivirus antigen could not be demonstrated within the skin lesion by immunohistochemical staining. The cat was treated for upper respiratory infection and 1 month later the nasal lesion had resolved. A firm and rounded swelling over the bridge of the nose may be a feline cutaneous plasmacytic reaction pattern.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY
Vet. Dermatol.
volume
21
issue
4
pages
412 - 414
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000279406100012
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.647 (2010)
JCR rank
23/145 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0959-4493
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3164.2010.00869.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1258627
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1258627
date created
2011-06-09 12:12:25
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:35
@article{1258627,
  abstract     = {A cat with an upper respiratory infection was presented for examination. Close examination of the face revealed a firm, haired rounded swelling on the bridge of the nose. Serum protein electrophoresis demonstrated a mild hypergammaglobulinaemia. The cat tested negative for feline immunodeficiency virus. Skin biopsy of the nasal lesion revealed nodular angiocentric infiltrates in the deep dermis and subcutis. The mixed infiltrate had numerous plasma cells. Presence of calicivirus antigen could not be demonstrated within the skin lesion by immunohistochemical staining. The cat was treated for upper respiratory infection and 1 month later the nasal lesion had resolved. A firm and rounded swelling over the bridge of the nose may be a feline cutaneous plasmacytic reaction pattern.},
  author       = {Declercq, Jan and De Bosschere, Hendrik},
  issn         = {0959-4493},
  journal      = {VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {412--414},
  title        = {Nasal swelling due to plasma cell infiltrate in a cat without plasma cell pododermatitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3164.2010.00869.x},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Declercq, Jan, and Hendrik De Bosschere. 2010. “Nasal Swelling Due to Plasma Cell Infiltrate in a Cat Without Plasma Cell Pododermatitis.” Veterinary Dermatology 21 (4): 412–414.
APA
Declercq, Jan, & De Bosschere, H. (2010). Nasal swelling due to plasma cell infiltrate in a cat without plasma cell pododermatitis. VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY, 21(4), 412–414.
Vancouver
1.
Declercq J, De Bosschere H. Nasal swelling due to plasma cell infiltrate in a cat without plasma cell pododermatitis. VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY. 2010;21(4):412–4.
MLA
Declercq, Jan, and Hendrik De Bosschere. “Nasal Swelling Due to Plasma Cell Infiltrate in a Cat Without Plasma Cell Pododermatitis.” VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY 21.4 (2010): 412–414. Print.