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Polymer gel dosimetry

Clive Baldock, Yves De Deene UGent, Simon Doran, Geoffrey Ibbott, A Jirasek, M Lepage, KB McAuley, M Oldham and LJ Schreiner (2010) PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. 55(1). p.R1-R63
abstract
Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HYDROXYMETHYL PHOSPHONIUM CHLORIDE, NEUTRON-CAPTURE THERAPY, CROSS-LINKING COPOLYMERIZATION, TARGETED RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY, NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE, ULTRASONIC-ATTENUATION COEFFICIENT, X-RAY CT, RADIATION-DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS, DIFFUSION-CONTROLLED TERMINATION, OPTICAL-CT
journal title
PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY
Phys. Med. Biol.
volume
55
issue
1
pages
R1 - R63
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000274554100023
JCR category
ENGINEERING, BIOMEDICAL
JCR impact factor
3.056 (2010)
JCR rank
11/68 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0031-9155
DOI
10.1088/0031-9155/55/5/R01
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1257467
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1257467
date created
2011-06-08 11:48:13
date last changed
2011-06-10 16:14:39
@article{1257467,
  abstract     = {Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.},
  author       = {Baldock, Clive and De Deene, Yves and Doran, Simon and Ibbott, Geoffrey and Jirasek, A and Lepage, M and McAuley, KB and Oldham, M and Schreiner, LJ},
  issn         = {0031-9155},
  journal      = {PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {HYDROXYMETHYL PHOSPHONIUM CHLORIDE,NEUTRON-CAPTURE THERAPY,CROSS-LINKING COPOLYMERIZATION,TARGETED RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY,NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE,ULTRASONIC-ATTENUATION COEFFICIENT,X-RAY CT,RADIATION-DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS,DIFFUSION-CONTROLLED TERMINATION,OPTICAL-CT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {R1--R63},
  title        = {Polymer gel dosimetry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/55/5/R01},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Baldock, Clive, Yves De Deene, Simon Doran, Geoffrey Ibbott, A Jirasek, M Lepage, KB McAuley, M Oldham, and LJ Schreiner. 2010. “Polymer Gel Dosimetry.” Physics in Medicine and Biology 55 (1): R1–R63.
APA
Baldock, C., De Deene, Y., Doran, S., Ibbott, G., Jirasek, A., Lepage, M., McAuley, K., et al. (2010). Polymer gel dosimetry. PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 55(1), R1–R63.
Vancouver
1.
Baldock C, De Deene Y, Doran S, Ibbott G, Jirasek A, Lepage M, et al. Polymer gel dosimetry. PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY. 2010;55(1):R1–R63.
MLA
Baldock, Clive, Yves De Deene, Simon Doran, et al. “Polymer Gel Dosimetry.” PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY 55.1 (2010): R1–R63. Print.