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Specific impact of Tobamovirus infection on the arabidopsis small RNA profile

Quanan Hu, Jens Hollunder UGent, Annette Niehl, Camilla J Kørner, Dalya Gereige, David Windels, Andreas Arnold, Martin Kuiper, Franck Vazquez and Mikhail Pooggin, et al. (2011) PLOS ONE. 6(5). p.1-15
abstract
Tobamoviruses encode a silencing suppressor that binds small RNA (sRNA) duplexes in vitro and supposedly in vivo to counteract antiviral silencing. Here, we used sRNA deep-sequencing combined with transcriptome profiling to determine the global impact of tobamovirus infection on Arabidopsis sRNAs and their mRNA targets. We found that infection of Arabidopsis plants with Oilseed rape mosaic tobamovirus causes a global size-specific enrichment of miRNAs, ta-siRNAs, and other phased siRNAs. The observed patterns of sRNA enrichment suggest that in addition to a role of the viral silencing suppressor, the stabilization of sRNAs might also occur through association with unknown host effector complexes induced upon infection. Indeed, sRNA enrichment concerns primarily 21-nucleotide RNAs with a 5 '-terminal guanine. Interestingly, ORMV infection also leads to accumulation of novel miRNA-like sRNAs from miRNA precursors. Thus, in addition to canonical miRNAs and miRNA*s, miRNA precursors can encode additional sRNAs that may be functional under specific conditions like pathogen infection. Virus-induced sRNA enrichment does not correlate with defects in miRNA-dependent ta-siRNA biogenesis nor with global changes in the levels of mRNA and ta-siRNA targets suggesting that the enriched sRNAs may not be able to significantly contribute to the normal activity of pre-loaded RISC complexes. We conclude that tobamovirus infection induces the stabilization of a specific sRNA pool by yet unknown effector complexes. These complexes may sequester viral and host sRNAs to engage them in yet unknown mechanisms involved in plant: virus interactions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PLANT DEVELOPMENT, REPLICATION PROTEIN, VIRAL SUPPRESSORS, ANTIVIRAL IMMUNITY, TOBACCO-MOSAIC-VIRUS, TRANS-ACTING SIRNAS, DNA METHYLATION, SMALL SILENCING RNAS, ARGONAUTE PROTEINS, BIOGENESIS
journal title
PLOS ONE
PLoS One
volume
6
issue
5
article_number
e19549
pages
1 - 15
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000290440200010
JCR category
BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.092 (2011)
JCR rank
12/84 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0019549
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1249328
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1249328
date created
2011-05-31 14:34:07
date last changed
2011-06-10 13:25:07
@article{1249328,
  abstract     = {Tobamoviruses encode a silencing suppressor that binds small RNA (sRNA) duplexes in vitro and supposedly in vivo to counteract antiviral silencing. Here, we used sRNA deep-sequencing combined with transcriptome profiling to determine the global impact of tobamovirus infection on Arabidopsis sRNAs and their mRNA targets. We found that infection of Arabidopsis plants with Oilseed rape mosaic tobamovirus causes a global size-specific enrichment of miRNAs, ta-siRNAs, and other phased siRNAs. The observed patterns of sRNA enrichment suggest that in addition to a role of the viral silencing suppressor, the stabilization of sRNAs might also occur through association with unknown host effector complexes induced upon infection. Indeed, sRNA enrichment concerns primarily 21-nucleotide RNAs with a 5 '-terminal guanine. Interestingly, ORMV infection also leads to accumulation of novel miRNA-like sRNAs from miRNA precursors. Thus, in addition to canonical miRNAs and miRNA*s, miRNA precursors can encode additional sRNAs that may be functional under specific conditions like pathogen infection. Virus-induced sRNA enrichment does not correlate with defects in miRNA-dependent ta-siRNA biogenesis nor with global changes in the levels of mRNA and ta-siRNA targets suggesting that the enriched sRNAs may not be able to significantly contribute to the normal activity of pre-loaded RISC complexes. We conclude that tobamovirus infection induces the stabilization of a specific sRNA pool by yet unknown effector complexes. These complexes may sequester viral and host sRNAs to engage them in yet unknown mechanisms involved in plant: virus interactions.},
  articleno    = {e19549},
  author       = {Hu, Quanan and Hollunder, Jens and Niehl, Annette and K{\o}rner, Camilla J and Gereige, Dalya and Windels, David and Arnold, Andreas and Kuiper, Martin and Vazquez, Franck and Pooggin, Mikhail and Heinlein, Manfred},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {PLANT DEVELOPMENT,REPLICATION PROTEIN,VIRAL SUPPRESSORS,ANTIVIRAL IMMUNITY,TOBACCO-MOSAIC-VIRUS,TRANS-ACTING SIRNAS,DNA METHYLATION,SMALL SILENCING RNAS,ARGONAUTE PROTEINS,BIOGENESIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {e19549:1--e19549:15},
  title        = {Specific impact of Tobamovirus infection on the arabidopsis small RNA profile},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0019549},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Hu, Quanan, Jens Hollunder, Annette Niehl, Camilla J Kørner, Dalya Gereige, David Windels, Andreas Arnold, et al. 2011. “Specific Impact of Tobamovirus Infection on the Arabidopsis Small RNA Profile.” Plos One 6 (5): 1–15.
APA
Hu, Q., Hollunder, J., Niehl, A., Kørner, C. J., Gereige, D., Windels, D., Arnold, A., et al. (2011). Specific impact of Tobamovirus infection on the arabidopsis small RNA profile. PLOS ONE, 6(5), 1–15.
Vancouver
1.
Hu Q, Hollunder J, Niehl A, Kørner CJ, Gereige D, Windels D, et al. Specific impact of Tobamovirus infection on the arabidopsis small RNA profile. PLOS ONE. 2011;6(5):1–15.
MLA
Hu, Quanan, Jens Hollunder, Annette Niehl, et al. “Specific Impact of Tobamovirus Infection on the Arabidopsis Small RNA Profile.” PLOS ONE 6.5 (2011): 1–15. Print.