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Some coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species affect udder health more than others

Karlien Supré UGent, Freddy Haesebrouck UGent, RN Zadoks, Mario Vaneechoutte UGent, Sofie Piepers UGent and Sarne De Vliegher UGent (2011) JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 94(5). p.2329-2340
abstract
A longitudinal study in 3 dairy herds was conducted to profile the distribution of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) species causing bovine intramammary infection (IMI) using molecular identification and to gain more insight in the pathogenic potential of CNS as a group and of the most prevalent species causing IMI. Monthly milk samples from 25 cows in each herd as well as samples from clinical mastitis were collected over a 13-mo period. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were identified to the species level using transfer-RNA intergenic spacer PCR. The distribution of CNS causing IMI was highly herd-dependent, but overall, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus cohnii, and Staphylococcus simulans were the most prevalent. No CNS species were found to cause clinical mastitis. The effect of the most prevalent species on the quarter milk somatic cell count (SCC) was analyzed using a linear mixed model, showing that Staph. chromogenes, Staph. simulans, and Staph. xylosus induced an increase in the SCC that is comparable with that of Staphylococcus aureus. Almost all CNS species were able to cause persistent IMI, with Staph. chromogenes causing the most persistent infections. In conclusion, accurate species identification cannot be ignored when studying the effect of CNS on udder health, as the effect on SCC differs between species and species distribution is herd-specific. Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staph. simulans, and Staph. xylosus seem to be the more important species and deserve special attention in further studies. Reasons for herd dependency and possible cow-and quarter-level risk factors should be examined in detail for the different species, eventually leading to cost-benefit analyses for management changes and, if needed, treatment recommendations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
COWS, INTERGENIC SPACER PCR, mastitis, somatic cell count, bovine intramammary infection, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, SOMATIC-CELL COUNT, LEVEL RISK-FACTORS, DUTCH DAIRY HERDS, MASTITIS PATHOGENS, INTRAMAMMARY INFECTIONS, CLINICAL MASTITIS, BOVINE MAMMARY-GLAND, TEAT APICES
journal title
JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE
J. Dairy Sci.
volume
94
issue
5
pages
2329 - 2340
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000289789000018
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
2.564 (2011)
JCR rank
2/54 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0022-0302
DOI
10.3168/jds.2010-3741
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1248521
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1248521
date created
2011-05-31 11:24:03
date last changed
2011-06-01 16:09:55
@article{1248521,
  abstract     = {A longitudinal study in 3 dairy herds was conducted to profile the distribution of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) species causing bovine intramammary infection (IMI) using molecular identification and to gain more insight in the pathogenic potential of CNS as a group and of the most prevalent species causing IMI. Monthly milk samples from 25 cows in each herd as well as samples from clinical mastitis were collected over a 13-mo period. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were identified to the species level using transfer-RNA intergenic spacer PCR. The distribution of CNS causing IMI was highly herd-dependent, but overall, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus cohnii, and Staphylococcus simulans were the most prevalent. No CNS species were found to cause clinical mastitis. The effect of the most prevalent species on the quarter milk somatic cell count (SCC) was analyzed using a linear mixed model, showing that Staph. chromogenes, Staph. simulans, and Staph. xylosus induced an increase in the SCC that is comparable with that of Staphylococcus aureus. Almost all CNS species were able to cause persistent IMI, with Staph. chromogenes causing the most persistent infections. In conclusion, accurate species identification cannot be ignored when studying the effect of CNS on udder health, as the effect on SCC differs between species and species distribution is herd-specific. Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staph. simulans, and Staph. xylosus seem to be the more important species and deserve special attention in further studies. Reasons for herd dependency and possible cow-and quarter-level risk factors should be examined in detail for the different species, eventually leading to cost-benefit analyses for management changes and, if needed, treatment recommendations.},
  author       = {Supr{\'e}, Karlien and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Zadoks, RN and Vaneechoutte, Mario and Piepers, Sofie and De Vliegher, Sarne},
  issn         = {0022-0302},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {COWS,INTERGENIC SPACER PCR,mastitis,somatic cell count,bovine intramammary infection,coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species,SOMATIC-CELL COUNT,LEVEL RISK-FACTORS,DUTCH DAIRY HERDS,MASTITIS PATHOGENS,INTRAMAMMARY INFECTIONS,CLINICAL MASTITIS,BOVINE MAMMARY-GLAND,TEAT APICES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {2329--2340},
  title        = {Some coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species affect udder health more than others},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2010-3741},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Supré, Karlien, Freddy Haesebrouck, RN Zadoks, Mario Vaneechoutte, Sofie Piepers, and Sarne De Vliegher. 2011. “Some Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus Species Affect Udder Health More Than Others.” Journal of Dairy Science 94 (5): 2329–2340.
APA
Supré, K., Haesebrouck, F., Zadoks, R., Vaneechoutte, M., Piepers, S., & De Vliegher, S. (2011). Some coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species affect udder health more than others. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE, 94(5), 2329–2340.
Vancouver
1.
Supré K, Haesebrouck F, Zadoks R, Vaneechoutte M, Piepers S, De Vliegher S. Some coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species affect udder health more than others. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 2011;94(5):2329–40.
MLA
Supré, Karlien, Freddy Haesebrouck, RN Zadoks, et al. “Some Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus Species Affect Udder Health More Than Others.” JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE 94.5 (2011): 2329–2340. Print.