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Increased serum-soluble interleukin-5 receptor alpha level precedes the development of eczema in children

(2010) PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY. 21(7). p.1052-1058
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Abstract
Interleukin-5 receptor alpha-subunit expression may be implicated in the development of allergic diseases. In a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the relationship between IL-5R alpha and the development of allergic phenotypes in childhood, using soluble IL-5R alpha (s-IL-5R alpha) as a marker. Children (n = 510) were followed from birth and assessed at age 3, 5 and 8. Based on the onset and resolution of symptoms, we assigned children into the following wheeze and eczema phenotypes: never, transient, persistent, intermittent and late-onset. Specific IgE to common allergens, s-IL-5R alpha (ELISA) and urinary eosinophilic protein X (U-EPX) levels was measured at age 5. s-IL-5R alpha was significantly higher among atopic compared to non-atopic children (pg/ml, geometric means [95% CI], 152.4 [126.0-184.5] vs. 103.4 [94.0-113.9], p < 0.0001). While we found no association between s-IL-5R alpha and current eczema at age 5, there was a significant association between eczema phenotypes and s-IL-5R alpha (multiple anova model adjusted for gender and atopy, F = 2.56, p = 0.04). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, we found that children with late-onset eczema had significantly higher s-IL-5R alpha compared to those who have never had eczema (mean difference [95% CI], 2.41 [1.03-5.62], p = 0.04) and those with intermittent eczema (2.63 [1.08-6.41], p = 0.02), with no difference between children who have never had eczema and other eczema phenotypes. We found no such association for wheeze phenotypes. There was a weak correlation between s-IL-5R alpha and U-EPX (r = 0.16, p < 0.0001). Increased serum s-IL-5R alpha level at age 5 was associated with contemporaneous atopic sensitization and with subsequent development of eczema by age 8.
Keywords
PROTEIN-X, EXPRESSION, EARLY-LIFE, IL-5 RECEPTOR, SYMPTOMS, ISOFORMS, SUBUNIT, DIFFERENTIATION, EOSINOPHILS, soluble IL-5R alpha, eczema, children, birth cohort, ATOPIC-DERMATITIS

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Semic-Jusufagic, Aida, Philippe Gevaert, Claus Bachert, Clare Murray, Angela Simpson, and Adnan Custovic. 2010. “Increased Serum-soluble Interleukin-5 Receptor Alpha Level Precedes the Development of Eczema in Children.” Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 21 (7): 1052–1058.
APA
Semic-Jusufagic, A., Gevaert, P., Bachert, C., Murray, C., Simpson, A., & Custovic, A. (2010). Increased serum-soluble interleukin-5 receptor alpha level precedes the development of eczema in children. PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, 21(7), 1052–1058.
Vancouver
1.
Semic-Jusufagic A, Gevaert P, Bachert C, Murray C, Simpson A, Custovic A. Increased serum-soluble interleukin-5 receptor alpha level precedes the development of eczema in children. PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY. 2010;21(7):1052–8.
MLA
Semic-Jusufagic, Aida, Philippe Gevaert, Claus Bachert, et al. “Increased Serum-soluble Interleukin-5 Receptor Alpha Level Precedes the Development of Eczema in Children.” PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 21.7 (2010): 1052–1058. Print.
@article{1241535,
  abstract     = {Interleukin-5 receptor alpha-subunit expression may be implicated in the development of allergic diseases. In a population-based birth cohort, we investigated the relationship between IL-5R alpha and the development of allergic phenotypes in childhood, using soluble IL-5R alpha (s-IL-5R alpha) as a marker. Children (n = 510) were followed from birth and assessed at age 3, 5 and 8. Based on the onset and resolution of symptoms, we assigned children into the following wheeze and eczema phenotypes: never, transient, persistent, intermittent and late-onset. Specific IgE to common allergens, s-IL-5R alpha (ELISA) and urinary eosinophilic protein X (U-EPX) levels was measured at age 5. s-IL-5R alpha was significantly higher among atopic compared to non-atopic children (pg/ml, geometric means [95% CI], 152.4 [126.0-184.5] vs. 103.4 [94.0-113.9], p < 0.0001). While we found no association between s-IL-5R alpha and current eczema at age 5, there was a significant association between eczema phenotypes and s-IL-5R alpha (multiple anova model adjusted for gender and atopy, F = 2.56, p = 0.04). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, we found that children with late-onset eczema had significantly higher s-IL-5R alpha compared to those who have never had eczema (mean difference [95% CI], 2.41 [1.03-5.62], p = 0.04) and those with intermittent eczema (2.63 [1.08-6.41], p = 0.02), with no difference between children who have never had eczema and other eczema phenotypes. We found no such association for wheeze phenotypes. There was a weak correlation between s-IL-5R alpha and U-EPX (r = 0.16, p < 0.0001). Increased serum s-IL-5R alpha level at age 5 was associated with contemporaneous atopic sensitization and with subsequent development of eczema by age 8.},
  author       = {Semic-Jusufagic, Aida and Gevaert, Philippe and Bachert, Claus and Murray, Clare and Simpson, Angela and Custovic, Adnan},
  issn         = {0905-6157},
  journal      = {PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY},
  keywords     = {PROTEIN-X,EXPRESSION,EARLY-LIFE,IL-5 RECEPTOR,SYMPTOMS,ISOFORMS,SUBUNIT,DIFFERENTIATION,EOSINOPHILS,soluble IL-5R alpha,eczema,children,birth cohort,ATOPIC-DERMATITIS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1052--1058},
  title        = {Increased serum-soluble interleukin-5 receptor alpha level precedes the development of eczema in children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2010.01077.x},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2010},
}

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